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TOPIC: miami

Economy

Are Rich Latin Americans Creating A Miami Real Estate Bubble?

Wealthy Latin Americans have been among the most active home buyers in Miami, which now may be creating a "tough" sellers' market perceived by some as simply a haven for assets threatened by instability in home countries.

-Analysis-

MIAMI — If New York is the city that never sleeps, Miami may well be the city that never stops growing. Florida's bilingual paradise with dreamy beaches is expanding both upwards and sideways, and has received almost 1,000 new residents a day since 2020, according to figures from local realtors ISG Realty and ISG World.

The attraction has spread to surrounding districts and counties, both for Florida's climate and beaches and for the security and stability the United States assures. Geraldo, a financier from Peru, has been living in Weston, in Broward County north-east of Miami, for almost a year. He decided to buy a house with a garden there for the area's reputable schools, infrastructure and "impressive security." These and other factors like Florida's lower personal taxes have all fueled demand for homes in several districts of southern Florida and also in Orlando, Jacksonville and Tampa.

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What Is Art? A 20th-Century Question Oddly Lingers On

Are explicitly polemical art works, by now a tradition in modern culture, related to the wave of rebellions across the world? Or are they just a moneymaking tool?

-Essay-

BUENOS AIRES — Act I: Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan tapes a banana to a gallery wall at the Art Basel fair in Miami, which a French collector buys for $120,000. Act II: David Datuna, an American artist, walks up to the banana, pulls it off of the wall, peels and eats it. This scene is filmed: an artistic happening, as it were.

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Climate Change Idea: Shipping Containers Recycled Into Homes

These easy-to-build and 'climate-change-proof' homes are growing popular in places like Miami that are prone to hurricanes and flooding.

BUENOS AIRES - Shipping containers are becoming popular in southern Florida as living spaces, amid a growing interest in small homes that can resist hurricanes and termites, both recurrent problems given the area's climate. Various companies, including MF Global architects, offer container homes for the reasonable price of $1,000 per square meter.
Argentina"s Mariano Bogani, who founded MF Global in 2016, says "it is not profitable to return containers to their source or send them to a local factory for melting, which also pollutes." Bogani is of Italian descent and his family have long worked in metallurgy. He presently works on recycling containers into home building components. He says "Miami-Dade County, in the south-east of Florida, has the strictest construction code in the United States. It took me nine months of adjustments and tests before I obtained the approval of plans for the first house. In 2017, county authorities began elaborating a building code for homes made with containers using the information and experience from our project."
The impact on the soil is minimal.
He remembers when he began work, some firefighters stopped by to visit the building site. "They were positively impressed and commented on the containers' anti-fire characteristics, beside their low environmental impact," he says.
The first project consisted of two houses with a surface area of 100 square meters each, made of six containers in total. Four of them were 12-meters long and two measured 13.7 meters; all were 2.9 meters high. Inside these were divided into three rooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen and a dining/living space. Building was 94% with dry construction techniques (DCT), and concrete was used only in the foundations. In the future, says Bogani, "depending on the soil you are building on, these can be prefabricated and just installed."
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Shipping containers are a viable alternative to other building materials — Photo: Clarín
Due to the local soil type and hurricane risks in Miami, the containers had 28 supporting foundations welded onto an iron sheet holding each column. The impact on the soil, says Bogani, "is minimal. This plot has three 90-year-old oaks, Florida's most protected tree." The containers were modified, with columns replacing some walls. Openings were cut and window frames added, and walls consisted of plaster-lined, galvanized profiles. There was "absolutely no use of any wood for the structures," Bogani said, "as there is also a termite problem affecting all homes here. In fact there is annual insurance for this, which was not necessary in this case."
The roof is prepared for solar panels and water recycling equipment to drain rainwater into a storage tank. All plumbing was placed under the structures, easily accessible for any reparation.

Why U.S. Policy On Cuba Has Reached A Tipping Point

Increasingly, the general American public and even anti-Castro businessmen now seem to agree that less hostility toward Cuba is the best road to take.

-Analysis-

BOGOTA – Public debate on Cuba in American politics had long been frozen, due to Florida's importance in U.S. elections and the weight of the Cuban-American lobby. But something has changed, and we can begin to discern an emerging consensus among politicians, businessmen, intellectuals, media, civic leaders and the public on the need to change Washington's strategy toward Cuba.

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Sources

Hit It! Daft Punk, Kylie Monogue, More On World Music Charts

Here are some of the songs topping the charts from music hot spots around the world.

Worldcrunch Pick

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eyes on the U.S.
Sonia Osorio

How Brazilians Help To Keep Miami Afloat

Brazil has overtaken Canada as the top foreign source of both tourists and property buyers in the Florida city, which has been suffering through the real estate and financial crises.

MIAMI - Although the Portuguese language has yet to conquer this multi-cultural city, Brazilians still feel very much at home in Miami.

“There is a love affair between Brazilians and Miami, which has helped the economy in both places,” says Rolando Aedo, executive vice-president of the Greater Miami Office of Tourism and Conventions.

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