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TOPIC: estonia

In The News

Fresh Troops Arriving As Final Battle For Kherson Appears Imminent

A missile attack early Friday kills four, as civilians try to evacuate the largest Ukrainian city under Russian occupation.

The Ukrainian military's General Staff reports that up to 2,000 Russian troops have arrived in the wider occupied Kherson region to replenish losses and reinforce units on the southern front line. These troops are believed to be made up of men called up in Vladimir Putin’s “partial mobilization,” brought in for what many believe will be a major battle for the key port city and regional capital of Kherson.

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The Kremlin has accused Ukrainian forces overnight of targeting civilians evacuating from the Russian-controlled city of Kherson, after a missile attack killed at least four.

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Russia Evacuates Kherson — What It Says About Kyiv's Counteroffensive

The southern city, which fell to Moscow's forces in the first days of the war, could become the clearest symbol of the success of Ukraine's autumn drive to retake territory.

"Dear residents! Ukrainian army will be shelling residential areas…" Such read the message early Wednesday from Kirill Stremousov, deputy head of the Russian occupation administration of the Kherson region, calling for the evacuation of up to 60,000 people.

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Stremousov’s evacuation orders is an acknowledgement of the ongoing loss of territory of pro-Russian forces in the southern region, following a similar announcement Tuesday by the new commander of Russian troops in Ukraine, General Sergey Surovikin, who warned that Kyiv was taking aim at the region’s nearby hydroelectric power plant.

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Can Turkey Be The Nuclear Peace Broker The World Needs Right Now?

With fears of a disaster at the Zaporizhzhia power plant on the world’s mind, three men met on Thursday in Lviv, to discuss nuclear security in the context of the Russian invasion of Ukraine: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres — and once again vowing to play a part in finding a solution to the conflict, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

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Since the start of the war, Turkey has offered its services as a mediator between Ukraine and Russia. During the trilateral meeting, Erdogan voiced his concern about Zaporizhzhia, saying it was imperative that a repeat of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster be avoided.

The Turkish president emphasized that he would like to organize peace talks between Russia and Ukraine, adding that he is planning on addressing the situation at the nuclear plant with Russian President Vladimir Putin. "We will discuss this issue with Putin and ask him specifically for Russia to do what it must as an important step for world peace," Erdogan said. Zelensky responded that the only way he would agree to negotiate with the Kremlin was if Russian troops left Ukraine.

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Nuclear Security On Top Of Agenda As Guterres And Erdogan Meet Zelensky

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan are due in Lviv today for a meeting with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

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The three will discuss grain and nuclear safety, while Erdogan is also reportedly planning to offer Ukrainian President Zelensky to organize a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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In The News
Anna Akage, Bertrand Hauger and Emma Albright

Zelensky Reveals Why He Didn’t Warn Ukrainians About Russian Invasion

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky revealed in an interview with the Washington Post on Tuesday that although he knew about the likelihood of a Russian invasion, the Ukrainian government did not make the news public to avoid causing panic. “We knew about the war, but we could not warn the Ukrainians about it, otherwise, we would have lost immediately.”

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CIA Director William Burns had visited Zelensky in mid-January to warn of a planned Russian attack. But Zelensky stated that informing the Ukrainian public would have made a Russian victory more likely:

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In The News
Anna Akage, Anne-Sophie Goninet, and Emma Albright

EU’s One-Two Punch At Russia — Sanctions Extended To 2023, Gas Imports Cut 15%

The European Union has renewed its sanctions against Russia until the end of January 2023, while also taking a major step to try to reduce dependency on Russian energy exports.

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The EU energy ministers were in Brussels today for a special Energy Council, and were tasked with renewing a wide range of sanctions for another six months that include restrictions on finance, energy, technology, transport and luxury goods. First introduced in 2014 in response to Russia’s annexation of Crimea, the tariffs were widely expanded after Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine in late February.

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blog
Bertrand Hauger

Baltic Leitmotiv

A man busking in the shade, a charming archway ... Going through my archives, this picture looked so familiar that I thought I'd already shown it here on Worldcrunch. But I was actually thinking of a different photograph that I took, as luck would have it, during the same tour of the Baltic states, in neighboring Riga.

Estonia

Estonia, Leading The EU Into The E-Future

With Britain missing its turn for the European Union presidency in light of Brexit, the rotating six-month duty has fallen into Estonia's lap earlier than planned.

Until the end of the year, the northernmost Baltic country will lead the EU through a complicated period: On top of difficult divorce negotiations between Britain and the 27-nation bloc, Estonia will also oversee talks on the Russian Nordstream 2 gas pipeline across the Baltic Sea to Germany, an issue over which several diverging interests are likely to face off in Europe.

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blog

Post-Soviet Spire

Strange to think that only five years before we toured the Baltic states, the spire of St. Olaf's church — which ranks among the tallest in the world — was still used as a radio tower and surveillance point by the KGB in the Estonian capital.

blog

Eurovision 2015 Contestants: Estonia

In 2001, Estonia became the first former Soviet country to win Eurovision. The annual song contest had become quite popular there after its first participation in 1994 and has always been since then. So much so that, in 2009, when Estonia said it would withdraw from the contest, set to be held in Moscow during to the ongoing Russo-Georgian War, the national broadcaster ERR announced it would still send an artist to perform in Russia due to public demand.

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