China's Entrepreneurs

Why Chinese Are Choosing Europe To Invest In Real Estate

BEIJING Yang Ke works for a high-tech company in Shenzhen on the southeast coast of China. Thanks to a few years spent abroad, he has saved up a considerable amount of money and is looking to invest it in foreign real estate. After intensive discussions with real estate agents, he decided that property in America is too pricey, and settled on Europe as the best option.

There is a rising affluent class in China who are making a similar choice as Yang — their savings are not sufficient for buying China's astronomically expensive properties in major cities such as Beijing, Shanghai or Guangzhou. Meanwhile, keeping the money sitting in a bank account is also a bad deal. So ... Europe.

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China, An Economic Superpower Lagging On Innovation

BEIJING â€" China can be proud of its achievements in both business innovation and in creating a technology-driven economy. In recent years Chinese enterprises have taken their place among the heavyweights in the technological sector and, in particular, in the information and communication industry: names such as Lenovo, Huawei, ZTE, Tencent and Xiaomi are recognized global leaders.

There are now even world-class Chinese competitors in the automobile industry such as BYD and Geely, while China is also now among the few countries to produce high-speed rail and aircraft manufacturing technology. The first Chinese-made large passenger aircraft, the C919, was rolled out in Shanghai in early November.

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Chen Dongshen: Diversifying Among The Living And Dead

BEIJING Chen Dongsheng has amassed a fortune with attention to both the mundane of insurance and the glamour of fine art.

He is the founder of three completely divergent enterprises — China Guardian Auctions, the first Chinese auction company to specialize in the sale of Chinese artwork; Kangtai Life, one of China’s largest life insurance and asset management firms; and ZJS Express, a home delivery service company.

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Wang Jianlin: Guts Is Religion For China's Richest Man

BEIJING — Wang Jianlin, chairman of Dalian Wanda Group, calmly states that he has set a goal of $99 billion (600 billion RMB) in revenue by 2020 for his real estate development company. Just as calmly, he then adds that he’ll retire that year to write his memoirs.

In mid-December, in front of dozens of reporters who showed up for the press conference of the Wanda Guilin City project, Wang’s sparse hair and bloodshot eyes betrayed a tired man. But he was announcing the launch of a colossal $4 billion (24 billion RMB) cultural and tourism real estate project that includes cinemas, a shopping mall, a theme park and luxurious hotels. It is the group’s third such project after those in Harbin and Nangchang.

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China's Entrepreneurs
Tang Xiangyang

Zong Qinghou - A No-Frills Beverage King

HANGZHOU — It's well known that nobody in Wahaha, China’s biggest beverage empire, dares challenge the word of Zong Qinghou. But the cult of personality surrounding the group’s founder, dubbed the "beverage king," goes much further: There are reports of how employees at a Wahaha dealers’ meeting shout Viva Wahaha! Viva Zong Qinghou!, and the rest of the audience breaks into applause.

After working on farms for 15 years, it was his mother’s retirement that pushed Zong, at the age of 33, to replace her in her job as a salesperson for a cardboard-box factory —and step into the world of business that he was destined to conquer.

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China's Entrepreneurs
Yang Yang

Robin Li: China's Tech Titan Always Ready To Pivot

The 45-year-old founder of Baidu, dubbed the "Google of China," says technology offers great opportunity for success – but also means failure can arrive at any moment.

BEIJING — As Robin Li was delivering his 2013 keynote address, “Believe in the Power of Technology,” at Baidu’s annual meeting, the market was busy questioning the Chinese tech giant for having shifted too slow to mobile.

But one year later, the largest Chinese search engine, sometimes called the “Google of China,” appears back in its dominant perch within China’s digital sector.

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China's Entrepreneurs
Li Yuan

Li Ning: Business Doesn't Have To Be A Contact Sport

BEIJING It was 30 years ago at the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics that a 20-year-old Chinese gymnast named Li Ning captured three gold medals, two silvers and one bronze with an array of never-before-seen flips and twists that he had invented himself.

Li, now 50, became China’s most decorated athlete and won the title “prince of gymnastics at China’s first Olympics after having boycotted the Games for nearly 30 years.

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