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-Editorial-

The fact that Dilma Rousseff decided to postpone her official visit to Washington, which had been planned for Oct. 23, has clearly illustrated that the United States’ decision to spy on the Brazilian president was not in the best interest of the United States.

Washington has very little to gain from reading Rousseff's emails or listening to her phone conversations. She is an ally, and has come close to sharing Washington’s positions on subjects such as the Middle East peace process and the Iranian nuclear program, which wasn’t the case during the presidency of her predecessor.

The United States has a lot to lose by spying on friends, both in reputation and leadership. And not only in Brazil, but around the world. There are few things worse than to be seen as a bully who abuses power.

The United States loses politically as well, because it now risks losing Brazil’s support in international organizations. It also loses economically: In response to the spying, the Brazilian government is considering a law that would prevent any American company that cooperates with espionage from operating in Brazil. The law has the potential to effect such giants as Google, Microsoft and other administrators of email systems. Brazil is studying how to reduce its reliance on the United States in terms of telecommunications infrastructure and is building an underwater cable to Europe for its Internet traffic.

There is at least one U.S. company that could lose a $5 billion deal. The Brazilian Air Force is going to modernize its fleet of combat planes next year with the purchase of 36 new planes. The finalists in the bidding process were the French company Dassault, the Swedish company Saad and America’s Boeing. Until the spying allegations surfaced, Rousseff was giving signs that she preferred Boeing’s F-18 Super Hornet, and that subject was among the topics she was planning to discuss in Washington during the now-postponed visit.

More importantly than the details of the situation with Brazil, the U.S. government and its citizens should feel ashamed that the National Security Agency (NSA) has spied on the emails, text messages and telephone conversations of the Brazilian president and her Mexican counterpart, Enrique Peña Nieto. Espionage is an act of aggression, prohibited by international law, and violates the founding charter of the United Nations. Finally, it flies in the face of the fundamental human right to privacy.

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Society

End Of Roe v. Wade, The World Is Watching

As the Supreme Court decides to overturn the 1973 decision that guaranteed abortion rights, many fear an imminent threat to abortion rights in the U.S. But in other countries, the global fight for sexual and reproductive rights is going in different directions.

"Don't abort my right" At 2019 pro-choice march In Toulouse, France.

Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via ZUMA
Hannah Steinkopf-Frank and Sophia Constantino

PARIS — Nearly 50 years after it ensured the right to abortion to Americans, the United States Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade case, meaning that millions of women in the U.S. may lose their constitutional right to abortion.

The groundbreaking decision is likely to set off a range of restrictions on abortion access in multiple states in the U.S., half of which are expected to implement new bans on the procedure. Thirteen have already passed "trigger laws" that will automatically make abortion illegal.

U.S. President Joe Biden called the ruling "a tragic error" and urged individual states to enact laws to allow the procedure.

In a country divided on such a polarizing topic, the decision is likely to cause major shifts in American law and undoubtedly spark outrage among the country’s pro-choice groups. Yet the impact of such a momentous shift, like others in the United States, is also likely to reverberate around the world — and perhaps, eventually, back again in the 50 States.

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