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food / travel

Watch: OneShot — Syria, When War Was Just A Game

Detail of photograph by Etienne Mallard
Detail of photograph by Etienne Mallard

When War Was Just A Game (© Étienne Mallard) | OneShot

Etienne Mallard has spent a lifetime venturing far and wide. A retired high-school philosophy teacher, he has always considered himself just an amateur photographer — with decent equipment. He has visited a running total now of 80 countries since he first went to Austria in 1949, all the while taking more than 20,000 pictures: from views across the Iron Curtain, a still sleepy Brazil in the 1960s to his most recent tour of the Balkans.

With a little help from his grandson (and Worldcrunch's photo editor) Bertrand Hauger, for the past five years Monsieur Mallard a.k.a. "Grand-Père" has been sharing his 60+ years of travels, one slide at a time. Since Worldcrunch launched its photo-video project, OneShot, we saw an opportunity to combine two of our favorite things.

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Ideas

A Writer's Advice For How To Read The Words Of Politics

Colombia's reformist president has promised to tackle endemic violence, economic exclusion, pollution and corruption in the country. So what's new with a politician's promises?

Image of Colombian President Gustavo Petro speaking during a press conference in Buenos Aires on Jan 14, 2023

Colombian President Gustavo Petro, speaks during a press conference in the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) Summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on January 24, 2023.

Manuel Cortina/ZUMA
Héctor Abad Faciolince

-Essay-

BOGOTÁ — Don't concentrate on his words, I was once advised, but look at what he's doing. I heard the words so long ago I cannot recall who said them. The point is, what's the use of a husband who vows never to beat his wife in January and leaves her with a bruised face in February?

Words are a strange thing, and in literal terms, we must distrust their meaning. As I never hit anyone, I have never declared that I wouldn't. It never occurred to me to say it. Strangely, there is more power and truth in a simple declaration like "I love her" than in the more emphatic "I love her so much." A verbal addition here just shrinks the "sense" of love.

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