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Watch: OneShot, Rohingya Ethnic Cleansing Began One Year Ago
Laure Gautherin

Saturday marks exactly one year since the Myanmar military began to force the Rohingya out of the Rakhine state in what a top United Nations official later called "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing." At least 700,000 people fled, mostly to neighboring Bangladesh, as efforts to repatriate the Muslim minority to Myanmar continue to stall.

Here is a OneShot video of one of the most dramatic images of Rohingya fleeing for their lives...

Photo: Richard Tsong-Taatarii/ZUMA

Earlier this week, Aung San Suu Kyi — a 1991 Nobel Peace Prize winner and de facto leader of Myanmar — continued to treat the issue as a security and diplomatic issue, insisting that there was no specific ethnicity that was targeted. "We, who are living through the transition in Myanmar, view it differently than those who observe it from the outside and who will remain untouched by its outcome," she said.

Meanwhile, new stories of Rohingya being raped and killed and families being separated continue to surface. Many have called for Suu Kyi's Nobel Peace Prize to be revoked — which is highly unlikely — though recently she was stripped of Scotland's Freedom of Edinburgh award.


​OneShot is a new digital format to tell the story of a single photograph in an immersive one-minute video.

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Ideas

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Elon Musk bought Twitter in the name of absolute freedom. But numerous research shows that social media hate speech leads to actual violence. Musk and others running social networks need to strike a balance.

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Freedom on social networks can result in insults and defamation

Jean-Marc Vittori

-Analysis-

PARIS — Elon Musk is the world's leading reckless driver. The ever unpredictable CEO of Tesla and SpaceX is now behind a very different wheel as the new head of Twitter.

He began by banning remote work before slightly backtracking and authorizing it for the company’s “significant contributors.” Now he’s opened the door to Donald Trump to return to Twitter, while at the same time vaunting a decrease in the number of hate-messages that appear on the social network…all while firing Twitter’s content moderation teams.

But this time, the world’s richest man will have to make choices. He’ll have to limit his otherwise unconditional love of free speech. “Freedom consists of being able to do everything that does not harm others,” proclaimed the French-born Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789.

Yet freedom on social networks results not only in insults and defamation, but sometimes also in physical aggression.

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