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Watch: OneShot, Rohingya Ethnic Cleansing Began One Year Ago
Laure Gautherin

Saturday marks exactly one year since the Myanmar military began to force the Rohingya out of the Rakhine state in what a top United Nations official later called "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing." At least 700,000 people fled, mostly to neighboring Bangladesh, as efforts to repatriate the Muslim minority to Myanmar continue to stall.

Here is a OneShot video of one of the most dramatic images of Rohingya fleeing for their lives...

Photo: Richard Tsong-Taatarii/ZUMA

Earlier this week, Aung San Suu Kyi — a 1991 Nobel Peace Prize winner and de facto leader of Myanmar — continued to treat the issue as a security and diplomatic issue, insisting that there was no specific ethnicity that was targeted. "We, who are living through the transition in Myanmar, view it differently than those who observe it from the outside and who will remain untouched by its outcome," she said.

Meanwhile, new stories of Rohingya being raped and killed and families being separated continue to surface. Many have called for Suu Kyi's Nobel Peace Prize to be revoked — which is highly unlikely — though recently she was stripped of Scotland's Freedom of Edinburgh award.

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Society

Return To Clay: Why An Ancient Building Material Is Back In Fashion

Concrete and glass are often thought of as the only building materials of modern architecture. But Francis Diébédo Kéré, the first African winner of a prestigious Pritzker architecture prize, works with clay, whose sustainability is not the only benefit.

Francis Diébédo Kéré extended the primary school in the village of Gando, Burkina Faso

Clara Le Fort

"Clay is fascinating. It has this unique grain and is both beautiful and soft. It soothes; it contributes to well-being..."

Francis Diébédo Kéré, the first African to be awarded the prestigious Pritzker Prize last March, is paying tribute to clay. It's a material that he adores, which has too often been shunned and attributed to modest constructions and peasant houses. Diébédo Kéré has always wanted to celebrate "earthen architecture”: buildings made out of clay. It's a technique that has been used for at least 10,000 years, which draws on this telluric element, known as dried mud, beaten earth, rammed earth, cob or adobe.

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