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Japan

Watch: OneShot — Raising The Flag On Iwo Jima, A Look Back

Detail of photograph by Joe Rosenthal
Detail of photograph by Joe Rosenthal

Six men, one flag: it is the defining image of the Greatest Generation.

No bodies, no planes or tanks, and yet it has become one of the most recognizable images of that worldwide conflict that killed tens of millions and changed history forever. It was 74 ago, on Feb. 23, 1945, that U.S. photographer Joe Rosenthal captured image later dubbed Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima. The photograph shows five U.S. Marines and a Navy corpsman planting the American flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in Japan. Three of the men — Sergeant Michael Strank, Corporal Harlon Block and Private First Class Franklin Sousley — died in combat later that same week.

The photo was distributed in newspapers two days after it was taken and quickly gained popularity nationwide, while Joe Rosenthal became the only photographer to win the Pulitzer Prize award within the same year of taking the picture. From memorial statues, postage stamps to countless homages (and parodies) in popular culture, few photographs have garnered such an iconic status.

In commemoration of the 74th anniversary of Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, OneShot brings this powerful photo to life.

Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima — © Joe Rosenthal/Associated Press



​OneShot is a new digital format to tell the story of a single photograph in an immersive one-minute video.

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Economy

Soft Power Or Sportwashing? What's Driving The Mega Saudi Image Makeover Play

Saudi Arabia suddenly now leads the world in golf, continues to attract top European soccer stars, and invests in culture and entertainment... Its "soft power" strategy is changing the kingdom's image through what critics bash as blatant "sportwashing."

Footballer Karim Benzema, in his Real Madrid kit

Karim Benzema during a football match at Santiago Bernabeu stadium on June 04, 2023, in Madrid, Spain.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — A major announcement this week caused quite a stir in the world of professional golf. It wouldn't belong in the politics section were it not for the role played by Saudi Arabia. The three competing world circuits have announced their merger, putting an end to the "civil war" in the world of pro golf.

The Chairman of the new entity is Yassir Al-Rumayan, head of the Saudi Arabian Public Investment Fund. Add to this the fact that one of the major players in the world of golf is Donald Trump – three of the biggest tournaments are held on golf courses he owns – and it's easy to see what's at stake.

In the same week, we learned that two leading French footballers, Karim Benzema and N'Golo Kanté, were to join Saudi club Al-Ittihad, also owned by the Saudi sovereign wealth fund. The amount of the transfer is not known, but it is sure to be substantial. There, they will join other soccer stars such as Cristiano Ronaldo.

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