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Detail of photograph by Joe Rosenthal
Detail of photograph by Joe Rosenthal

Six men, one flag: it is the defining image of the Greatest Generation.

No bodies, no planes or tanks, and yet it has become one of the most recognizable images of that worldwide conflict that killed tens of millions and changed history forever. It was 74 ago, on Feb. 23, 1945, that U.S. photographer Joe Rosenthal captured image later dubbed Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima. The photograph shows five U.S. Marines and a Navy corpsman planting the American flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima in Japan. Three of the men — Sergeant Michael Strank, Corporal Harlon Block and Private First Class Franklin Sousley — died in combat later that same week.

The photo was distributed in newspapers two days after it was taken and quickly gained popularity nationwide, while Joe Rosenthal became the only photographer to win the Pulitzer Prize award within the same year of taking the picture. From memorial statues, postage stamps to countless homages (and parodies) in popular culture, few photographs have garnered such an iconic status.

In commemoration of the 74th anniversary of Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, OneShot brings this powerful photo to life.

Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima — © Joe Rosenthal/Associated Press



​OneShot is a new digital format to tell the story of a single photograph in an immersive one-minute video.

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Geopolitics

Commonwealth Countries Will Now Decide To Keep Calm Or Move On

A difficult colonial history shared by 52 of the 56 current members of the Commonwealth was deftly obfuscated by pomp and circumstance. With the Queen’s passing, tensions may now bubble to the surface.

Prince Charles visits the town of Kingston in Jamaica

Priyanjali Malik*

-Analysis-

NEW DELHI — Turning 21 on April 21, 1947, the then Princess Elizabeth in a broadcast from South Africa dedicated her life to the Commonwealth and Empire, declaring that her “whole life whether it be long or short shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong”.

Four and a half years later, she was proclaimed queen and spent the first few decades of her reign watching that "imperial family’" shrink rapidly. In 1957, Ghana and Malaysia became the first colonies to seek independence after her accession; Britain’s last colony, Hong Kong, was returned to China in 1997. In the intervening four decades, Empire crumbled, leaving only memories of the time when Britannia ruled the waves.

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