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Future

Watch: OneShot — Hello Dolly!

Watch: OneShot — Hello Dolly!

Can a clone have a birthday? Well, let's just say that Dolly the sheep was delivered 22 years ago on July 5 — the world's first cloned mammal to see the light of day.

The result of a successful cloning experiment at The Roslin Institute in Scotland, the wooly work of science sparked public outcry back in 1996, eventually leading to an extension of the ban against embryo research in the United States.

Hello Dolly! — OneShot (© Roslin Institute)

Fears of cloning linger: Earlier this year, Chinese researchers were busy trying to convince the public that their cloned macaque monkeys did not mean they were ready to clone humans. Much of the furor, however, has dissipated. Selective assisted breeding (read: cloning) has become an accepted practice in livestock, while new examples of scientific use — especially in efforts to prevent (or even undo) total species extinction — keep making headlines.

As technology and science progress, much of the existential fear that was just fifteen years ago directed at cloning has now drifted toward other concerns, notably Artificial Intelligence. Sophia, the spookily lifelike robot who was recently given legal personhood by Saudi Arabia, raises all kinds of ethical issues. Meanwhile in France, some have argued that robots should be given a place in public policymaking.

To each era its own scientific nightmares. Back in 1968, Philip K. Dick asked, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Two decades after Dolly, we might ask instead what would happened if cloned sheep were fed with artificial intelligence.

OneShot is a new digital format to tell the story of a single photograph in an immersive one-minute video.

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Geopolitics

Modi Is Wrong: Russia's War Also Creates Real Risks For India

By shrugging aside Russia’s aggression, India has shown indifference to fears that China could follow Russia’s example.

Photo of India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi Visits Russia

Anita Inder Singh*

-OpEd-

NEW DELHI — India is wrong to dismiss Russia’s war in Ukraine as Europe’s problem. The illegality and destructiveness of the invasion, and consequential food and energy crises, have global ramifications.

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This explains why 143 out of the 193 member-states of the UN General Assembly voted against recognizing Russia’s illegal annexation of four Ukrainian regions after holding sham referenda there. Ninety-three voted in favor of expelling Russia from the UN Human Rights Council.

India has abstained from every vote in the UN condemning Russia’s aggression in Ukraine. The reason? Moscow is India’s top arms supplier and some 70% of India’s military platforms are of Russian origin.

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