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Photo Of The Week: This Happened In Mariupol

A Russian air raid struck a Mariupol maternity hospital, an unthinkable new moral low in Vladimir Putin's war. Soon after the strike, Associated Press photographer Evgeniy Maloletka was on the scene, capturing a powerful image of the horror of war.

Photo Of The Week: This Happened In Mariupol

A detail of the photo of the week

Laure Gautherin and Laura Valentina Cortés Sierra

The Russian invasion of Ukraine struck a new moral low this past week. The killing of civilians is multiplying across the country, notably in the besieged port city of Mariupol.

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For the past two weeks, Mariupol has been surrounded by Russian troops and Ukraine has tried several times to evacuate civilians through a humanitarian corridor from a city where more than 400,000 people have been without water or electricity for over a week.

On Wednesday, March 9, a Russian air raid struck a Mariupol maternity hospital, an unthinkable target that many have already labeled a war crime. Soon after the strike, Associated Press photographer Evgeniy Maloletka was on the scene, capturing a series of horrific images.



Maloletka is a Ukrainian freelance photojournalist based in Kiev, Ukraine, with more than 10 awards — including first place in the news story category of the 2015 APME photo contest. Maloletka started his career in 2009 and has covered the Ukrainian revolution since the beginning, before moving to cover the conflicts in Crimea and eastern Ukraine for various international media like The New York Times, The Washington Post, Der Spiegel, The Guardian, the BBC and Euronews.

See the video below for what may be the most memorable image of his career, and a visual indictment of the Russian invasion.

New Moral Low

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From Florida, The World's Most Secure Voting Machine (For Now)

After 19 years of work, Juan Gilbert says he has invented an "unhackable" voting machine. Ahead of Tuesday's U.S. midterms, some hardware hope for the future of free elections.

*Spenser Mestel

In late 2020, a large box arrived at Juan Gilbert’s office at the University of Florida. The computer science professor had been looking for this kind of product for months. Previous orders had yielded poor results. This time, though, he was optimistic.

Gilbert drove the package home. Inside was a transparent box, built by a French company and equipped with a 27-inch touchscreen. Almost immediately, Gilbert began modifying it. He put a printer inside and connected the device to Prime III, the voting system he has been building since the first term of the George W. Bush administration.

After 19 years of building, tinkering, and testing, he told Undark this spring, he had finally invented “the most secure voting technology ever created.

”Gilbert didn’t just want to publish a paper outlining his findings. He wanted the election security community to recognize what he’d accomplished — to acknowledge that this was, in fact, a breakthrough. In the spring of 2022, he emailed several of the most respected and vocal critics of voting technology, including Andrew Appel, a computer scientist at Princeton University. He issued a simple challenge: Hack my machine.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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