When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

In The News

Zelensky In Kherson, Xi And Biden Meet, Paris Olympics Mascots

Zelensky In Kherson, Xi And Biden Meet, Paris Olympics Mascots

Zelensky taking a selfie with members of Ukrainian forces in Kherson

Sophia Constantino, Bertrand Hauger and Anne-Sophie Goninet

👋 Bula!*

Welcome to Monday, where Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is in Kherson after it was recaptured from Russian forces, suspects are arrested after an Istanbul blast kills eight, and the mascots for the 2024 Paris Olympics are … walking hats. Meanwhile, for Romanian magazine DoR, Oana Sandu focuses on the long-lasting impact witnessing domestic violence has on children.

[*Fijian]

✅  SIGN UP

This is our daily newsletter Worldcrunch Today, a rapid tour of the news of the day from the world's best journalism sources, regardless of language or geography.

It's easy (and free!) to sign up to receive it each day in your inbox: 👉 Sign up here

🌎  7 THINGS TO KNOW RIGHT NOW

• Zelensky in Kherson: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky visited the key southern city of Kherson on Monday, three days after it was recaptured by Kyiv’s forces. Zelensky accused Russia of committing war crimes in the area, but also declared: "We are ready for peace, peace for all our country."

• Biden & Xi meet in Bali on sidelines of G20: U.S. President Joe Biden met Chinese President Xi Jinping for the first time in his presidency, speaking on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Bali on Monday. Biden said the encounter was to “show that China and the US can manage our differences.”

• Suspects arrested in Istanbul blast: Following the explosion in central Istanbul that killed eight and injured 81, Turkish police have arrested 46 people. Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu has blamed Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) for the blast, though Turkish authorities are also not ruling out involvement of ISIS.

• After Democrats confirm control of Senate, Republicans hope to take House: Final results over the weekend in Arizona and Nevada have assured that Democrats keep control of the Senate. Georgia’s Senate race has been pushed to a runoff on Dec 6, and a Democratic victory there could broaden their narrow majority. Though several House of Representative races are still up for grabs, it looks as though Republicans are getting closer to reaching the 218 seats required for majority control.

• Slovenia elects first female president: Slovenia elected Natasa Pirc Musar, its first female head of state in its presidential elections on Sunday. Election commission data shows the 54-year-old winning 53.86% of votes in the runoff, while her rival, right-wing politician and former foreign minister Andze Logar, won 46.14%.

• University of Virginia shooting: Three are dead in a shooting at the University of Virginia on Sunday night. Authorities say the gunman, Christopher Darnell Jones, was still at large Monday morning, university officials are urging people on the Charlottesville campus to shelter in place.

• Man who inspired The Terminal dies in Paris airport: The man who inspired Steven Spielberg’s movie, The Terminal, died on Saturday in Charles de Gaulle, the Paris airport he lived in for 18 years. Authorities say Mehran Karimi Nasseri died from a heart attack in the airport's Terminal 2F around midday after medical teams were unable to save him.

🗞️  FRONT PAGE

Turkey’s Milliyet reports on the terrorist attack in Istanbul’s İstiklal Street. So far, 46 people have been detained in relation to Sunday’s bomb explosion which killed eight and injured 81.

💬  LEXICON

Phryges

The Organizing Committee of the 2024 Paris Olympic and Paralympic Games has unveiled their two mascots, the Olympic Phryge and the Paralympic Phryge, which were designed as small red Phrygian caps — a symbol of the French Revolution and freedom. The creative team of Paris 2024 said they wanted to break away from mascots of previous games, which tended to be animals, and to create a mascot that would “embody the French spirit” as well as carry a part of the country’s history.

📰  STORY OF THE DAY

Bystander victims: Facing the trauma of children who witness domestic violence

Children who live amid domestic abuse are at serious risk of long-term physical and mental health problems. It's imperative we start to look deeply at these long-term effects because violence is passed down from generation to generation. Oana Sandu led a close-up investigation from Romania for independent quarterly magazine DoR.

🤐 We don't talk enough about children witnessing domestic violence. I've always felt they were ghosts in my interviews with surviving mothers and I portrayed them as such in the stories I've written. But I'll never forget their glances. The way in which exposure to domestic violence shapes children should be our job as adults, through our role as advocates for these small people who can't speak up and say what hurts them.

🗨️ We've lived for too long with the assumption that little ones forget. As a society, we've believed that they can't comprehend the danger of a violent incident or, even worse, that they naturally recover from exposure to trauma because they are simply resilient. The assumption was wrong, as many studies over the last 20 years have shown. And we need to talk about it, because otherwise we perpetuate violence against children. Because violence is socially learned and passed on from generation to generation.

⚠️ The post-traumatic stress experienced by children raised in domestic violence, experts say, is a state of hypervigilance similar to what is experienced by war veterans. Developing under stress leaves its mark. Sometimes children grow less or have difficulty eating, don't sleep well, find it harder to relax and can fall behind on many acquisitions, whether physical, verbal or intellectual. "Children who go through this are more fragile in terms of physical and mental health," says Diana Vasile, a psychotherapist and president of the Institute for the Study and Treatment of Trauma.

➡️ Read more on Worldcrunch.com

📣 VERBATIM

I feel betrayed.

— Portuguese soccer star Cristiano Ronaldo claimed in an interview with Piers Morgan for TalkTV, released on Sunday, that he is being forced out of Manchester United, a club where he won eight major trophies from 2003-2009 and that he rejoined in August 2021 from Juventus for a two-year deal. The five-time Ballon d’Or winner feels he has been sidelined since manager Erik Ten Hag took charge this year.

✍️ Newsletter by Sophia Constantino, Bertrand Hauger and Anne-Sophie Goninet


Let us know what’s happening in your corner of the world!

info@worldcrunch.com

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

Parenthood And The Pressure Of Always Having To Be Doing Better

As a father myself, I'm now better able to understand the pressures my own dad faced. It's helped me face my own internal demands to constantly be more productive and do better.

Photo of a father with a son on his shoulders

Father and son in the streets of Madrid, Spain

Ignacio Pereyra*

-Essay-

When I was a child — I must have been around eight or so — whenever we headed with my mom and grandma to my aunt's country house in Don Torcuato, outside of Buenos Aires, there was the joy of summer plans. Spending the day outdoors, playing soccer in the field, being in the swimming pool and eating delicious food.

But when I focus on the moment, something like a painful thorn appears in the background: from the back window of the car I see my dad standing on the sidewalk waving us goodbye. Sometimes he would stay at home. “I have to work” was the line he used.

Maybe one of my older siblings would also stay behind with him, but I'm sure there were no children left around because we were all enthusiastic about going to my aunt’s. For a long time in his life, for my old man, those summer days must have been the closest he came to being alone, in silence (which he liked so much) and in calm, considering that he was the father of seven. But I can only see this and say it out loud today.

Over the years, the scene repeated itself: the destination changed — it could be a birthday or a family reunion. The thorn was no longer invisible but began to be uncomfortable as, being older, my interpretation of the events changed. When words were absent, I started to guess what might be happening — and we know how random guessing can be.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest