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Zelensky To G7, Let’s Try To End War Before Winter

Ukrainian President Zelensky addressed the G7 leaders via video call at the summit in Kruen, Germany, where he asked to “intensify sanctions” against Russia and warned against the war dragging on.

Zelensky To G7, Let’s Try To End War Before Winter

G7 summit, working cession

Shaun Lavelle, Anna Akage and Emma Albright

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky told G7 leaders that he wanted the Russia-Ukraine war to end before the winter sets in, according to Reuters.

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Zelensky addressed the G7 leaders via video call at the summit in Kruen, Germany, where he asked to “intensify sanctions” against Russia. He also requested more reconstruction aid, aircraft defense systems, further help on exporting grain out of the country as well as security guarantees.


The Ukrainian president is also planning on addressing the NATO summit later this week in Madrid to ask for further help against Russia.

Meanwhile, speaking to reporters, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, has warned of growing “fatigue in populations and politicians” as he began talks at the G7 summit. Johnson hopes to push for renewed sanctions and isolate Russia from the international finance system.

World Leaders Target Russia With Fresh Sanctions At G7 Summit

Front cover Die Welt

As the G7 summit continues in Germany, world leaders look set to hit Vladimir Putin’s Russia with a fresh wave of sanctions, including imports of gold.

Gold is one of the country’s top exports after energy and has been particularly valuable to Russian elites looking to circumvent Western sanctions. U.K. prime ministerBoris Johnson said the gold band would “directly hit Russian oligarchs and strike at the heart of Putin's war machine."

G7 leaders will be hoping to pile more pressure on Putin as the country’s economy continues to struggle.Russia defaulted on its foreign-currency sovereign debt for the first time since 1918 as Western sanctions shut down payment routes to foreign creditors. The country missed a deadline of Sunday night to pay interest of $100 million on two Eurobonds originally due on May 27.

However, Moscow rejected the word default, saying it had the means to pay the debt but that sanctions have frozen its foreign currency reserves held abroad.

Kyiv Hit By Missiles For the First Time In Weeks, Lviv Also Targeted

Building damaged by Russian shelling

Sergei Chuzavkov/SOPA/Zuma


One man was killed and six people were hospitalized when two residential buildings in Kyivwere hit by Russian missiles on Sunday morning, the first attack on the Ukrainian capital in three weeks. Kyiv’s mayor, Vitali Klitschko, claimed the attacks were to “intimidate Ukrainians”.

Western leaders said that the missile strikes were a deliberate escalation ahead of a G7 meeting, taking place in Germany, and an upcoming NATO summit in Madrid on Tuesday.

Fighting in recent weeks has mostly been confined to the east of the country. However, explosions were also reported in other areas of Ukraine over the weekend, including Lviv in the west of the country.

Ukraine Accuses Russia Of Mass Forced Adoption Of Ukrainian Kids

Ukraine has accused the Russian army of kidnapping and deporting thousands of unaccompanied minors from occupied parts of the country, including orphans and children who have lost their parents during the invasion.

The accusation came in a report from Daria Gerasymchuk, who heads child safety policy for the office of the Ukrainian presidency, who said that 234,000 children have been forcibly deported to Russia, with 4,795 already identified.

"The Russian side calls what they are doing - in fact abducting Ukrainian children - evacuation," says Gerasymchuk. "The Russian Federation is not going to return Ukrainian children to Ukraine. They communicate this very clearly.”

100 More Bodies Found Of Those Killed In Mariupol Bombings


Bodies continue to be found under the rubble of houses in the southern city of Mariupol, the adviser to the mayor of Mariupol Petro Andryushchenko said on Telegram.

“During the inspection of buildings in the Livoberezhny district … more than 100 bodies of the victims of the bombing were found," writes Andryushchenko. He also added that Russians do not plan to seize and bury the bodies.

According to current estimates, more than 20,000 civilians were killed in Mariupol. Exit from the city is currently blocked by the Russian army, even amid reports that contagious diseases are spreading.

Fresh Evidence Of Russian Stealing Ukrainian Grain


After Russian forces were accused of stealing grain and other property from Ukrainian farmers in occupied areas, a new report by the BBC has analyzed satellite images and followed tracking data to look for evidence of where the stolen grain is being taken.

Documents show that the Russian-installed authorities have told farmers they're seizing their grain to ensure what they call "food security".

But CCTV from one farm captured the moment the Russians arrived and video footage showed looting. Some of the grain trucks that were stolen had GPS trackers on them, and using this data, evidence was found that they had gone into Crimea.

While Moscow denies any theft, U.S. officials have named nine ships believed to have transported the stolen grain from Crimea to other parts of the world.

Ukrainian Tennis Player On A “Mission”

Ukrainian tennis player Elina Svitolina has put her tennis career on hold to use her platform and provide as much help as she can to her country. The 27-year-old, who won the bronze medal in the Tokyo Olympics, is focusing on raising funds and awareness for her country. She is in regular contact with her family living in Odessa, her hometown, where she gets daily updates on the situation.

She is dedicating her time to the foundation UNITED24, which was set up by Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky, with the goal of raising funds for medical supplies, defense and eventually rebuilding the country’s infrastructure.

This comes after the tennis star had said she would donate all the prize money she won at the Monterrey Open to the Ukrainian army back in March.

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Geopolitics

A Ukrainian In Belgrade: The Straight Line From Milosevic To Putin, And Back Again

As hostilities flare again between Serbia and Kosovo, the writer draws connections between the dissolutions of both the USSR and Yugoslavia, and the leaders who exploit upheaval and feed the worst kind of nationalism.

On the streets of Belgrade, Serbia

Anna Akage

-Analysis-

At high school in Kyiv in the late 1990s, we studied the recent history of Yugoslavia: the details of its disintegration, the civil wars, the NATO bombing of Belgrade. When we compared Yugoslavia and the USSR, it seemed evident to us that if Boris Yeltsin or Mikhail Gorbachev had been anything like Serbian dictator Slobodan Milosevic, bloody wars would have been unavoidable for Ukraine, Belarus, and other republics that instead had seceded from the Soviet Union without a single shot being fired.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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Fast forward to 2020, when I visited Belgrade for the first time, invited for a friend's wedding. Looking around, I was struck by the decrepit state of its roads, the lack of any official marked cabs, by the drudgery, but most of all by the tension and underlying aggression in society. It was reflected in all the posters and inscriptions plastered on nearly every street. Against Albania, against Kosovo, against Muslims, claims for historical justice, Serbian retribution, and so on. A rather beautiful, albeit by Soviet standards, Belgrade seemed like a sleeping scorpion.

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