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Birds flying a truck dumping waste in Tingo Maria, Peru
Birds flying a truck dumping waste in Tingo Maria, Peru
Zorayda Portilo

LIMA — The Peruvian capital has no shortage of vultures flying overhead. For the past year they have also been enlisted to help find, and perhaps eventually clear, some of Lima's worst illegal trash heaps.

How is it done? The city and scientists have been using 10 vultures strapped with GPS and GoPro cameras to help follow their travels in the pursuit of every sort of leftovers.

The sprawling capital produces 45% of all the country's trash, recycling just 4% of it, and authorities are concerned by the impact on health. The technology sends information to authorities every half hour, say scientists involved with the project.

The devices recharge using the sun and the data can be viewed on several websites including Google Earth, says Letty Salinas, head of ornithology at the natural history museum of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. She has said the project will also show how buzzards interact with organic remains and how they might contribute to its control.

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In The News

War In Ukraine, Day 224: Russia Says U.S. Is Now "A Participant Of The Conflict"

The warning comes after Washington's latest military aid package to Ukraine.

In Stavropol, Russia

Anna Akage, Sophia Constantino, Jeff Israely and Bertrand Hauger

Washington’s new $625 military aid package to Kyiv has increased the likelihood of a direct military clash between the Russia and the West, warned Anatoly Antonov, Moscow’s ambassador to the U.S.

"We perceive this as an immediate threat to the strategic interests of our country," Antonov said early Wednesday via a post on Telegram. "The supply of military products by the U.S. and its allies not only entails protracted bloodshed and new casualties, but also increases the danger of a direct military clash between Russia and Western countries.” Antonov said the U.S. is now considered a “participant of the conflict.”

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The United States announced this week that it is sending $625 million to Ukraine in additional weaponry, including High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) launchers.

U.S. President Joe Biden spoke Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Tuesday, emphasizing Washington’s continued support for Kyiv “as it defends itself from Russian aggression for as long as it takes,” a statement from the White House said.

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