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FOHLA DE S.PAULO (Brazil)

Worldcrunch

SÃO PAULO - "Enjoy "ze flight!" One of the secret pleasures of international flying is checking out the fantastic range of accents of pilots and flight crews. Across all languages. But for security reasons, a very solid grasp of English is mandatory for all pilots on international flights.

Passengers on flights leaving Rio de Janiero or São Paulo may have noticed some seriously bumpy language skills of pilots, who frequently fail to remember crucial words when passing along basic flight information.

Now Brazil's Agency of National Civil Aviation (Anac) has also noticed some pilots' insufficient English skills, and found its apparent source: in Spain. Brazilian daily newspaper Folha de S. Paulo reports that by December 15, 37 pilots will have to prove once more they are capable of speaking good English. A lawyer showed Folha documents indicating the number could be even higher — as many as 94 people. Most of them belong to TAM, the nation's largest airline company.

All of the notified pilots had done their English tests in a Spanish school located in Madrid and certified by Aesa, the local aviation agency. From the beginning of 2012, Anac started to accept exams done there. The issue began when the Brazilian agency became suspicious of the high number of pilots taking tests in Madrid. The results were usually higher than those gotten in Brazil. In some cases, pilots who failed in Brazil succeeded in Spain.

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Geopolitics

Patronage Or Politics? What's Driving Qatar And Egypt Grand Rapprochement

For Cairo, Qatar had been part of an “axis of evil,” with anger directed at Al Jazeera, the main Qatari outlet, and others critical of Egypt after the Muslim Brotherhood ouster. But the vitriol is now gone, with the first ever visit by Egyptian President al-Sisi to Doha.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi met with the Emir of Qatar in June 2022 in Cairo

Beesan Kassab, Daniel O'Connell, Ehsan Salah, Hazem Tharwat and Najih Dawoud

For the first time since coming to power in 2014, President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi traveled to Doha last month on an official visit, a capstone in a steadily building rapprochement between the two countries in the last year.

Not long ago, however, the photo-op capturing the two heads of state smiling at one another in Doha would have seemed impossible. In the wake of the Armed Forces’ ouster of the Muslim Brotherhood government in 2013, Qatar and Egypt traded barbs.

In the lexicon of the intelligence-controlled Egyptian press landscape, Qatar had been part of an “axis of evil” working to undermine Egypt’s stability. Al Jazeera, the main Qatari outlet, was banned from Egypt, but, from its social media accounts and television broadcast, it regularly published salacious and insulting details about the Egyptian administration.

But all of that vitriol is now gone.

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