SYDNEY MORNING HERALD (Australia)

Worldcrunch

When you see red water on an Australian beach... you immediately think "shark attack!"

Sydney's most famous beach, Bondi beach, and neighboring Clovelly beach were closed on Tuesday after the water turned bright red. On Wednesday, 10 other Sydney beaches were closed according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

Photo: Bondi Rescue/Edwina Pickles

Photo @oystermag/Twitter

Photo @bondibaggins/Twitter

Photo: @jacintamused/Twitter

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Photo @thetimes/Twitter


Photo @UrbanSocietyAus/Twitter

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, the crimson color is caused by a red algae known as "Noctiluca scintillans," or "sea sparkle." "It has no toxic effects, but people are still advised to avoid swimming in areas with discolored water because the algae, which can be high in ammonia, can cause skin irritation."

Sea sparkle gets its name because it can be phosporescent at night.

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Society

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