When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

THE INDEPENDENT, THE GUARDIAN, THE DAILY MAIL, BBC (UK)

Worldcrunch

LONDON – British government food officials have warned the public not to eat frozen beef lasagna sold by the Findus brand after tests showed they contained up to 100% horsemeat.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has ordered all British companies to test their processed beef products by next Friday, after it was revealed that lasagna sold by Findus contained up to 100% horsemeat instead of the advertised beef, reports the Guardian.

Catherine Brown, the FSA's chief executive, told the BBC: "We are demanding that food businesses conduct authenticity tests on all beef products, such as beef burgers, meatballs and lasagna, and provide the results to the FSA. The tests will be for the presence of significant levels of horsemeat.”

[rebelmouse-image 27086261 alt="""" original_size="483x364" expand=1]

@MrBButterfield

The FSA tested 18 beef-based processed Findus lasagna and found that 11 of them contained 60% to 100% horsemeat. It is advising people who have bought any Findus lasagna not to eat them and return them to the shop they bought them from.

Findus’s lasagna, says the BBC, are made by French company Comigel, which also makes frozen products (pizzas, appetizers and ready-made meals) for Tesco, Aldi, Auchan and Cora supermarkets as well as Picard Surgelés and Thiriet frozen foods. As of Friday morning, Comigel’s website was offline:

By Friday, Aldi and Tesco supermarkets were clearing their shelves of frozen spaghetti and lasagna meals produced by Comigel, reports the Guardian.

A Tesco spokesman told the Guardian it took the step as a precaution: "Following the withdrawal of Findus beef lasagne, which is produced by Comigel, we have decided to withdraw our frozen Everyday Value Spaghetti Bolognese, which is produced at the same site, as a precautionary measure. There is no evidence that our product has been contaminated and the meat used in the Findus product is not used in our product. However, we have decided to withdraw the product pending the results of our own tests."

The FSA is saying there is no evidence the horsemeat lasagna is unsafe, reports the Independent, however it is testing Findus products for an equine drug called phenylbutazone, or “bute,” which can cause cancers in humans and is banned from the human food chain in the EU.

Bute is an anti-inflammatory drug that is given to animals regularly to treat, pain and fever. It is the most commonly used anti-inflammatory in horses, says the Daily Mail and is banned from the human food chain because it can cause cancer.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Future

Injecting Feminism Into Science Is A Good Thing — For Science

Feminists have generated a set of tools to make science less biased and more robust. Why don’t more scientists use it?

As objective as any man

Anto Magzan/ZUMA
Rachel E. Gross

-Essay-

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a mystery played out across news headlines: Men, it seemed, were dying of infection at twice the rate of women. To explain this alarming disparity, researchers looked to innate biological differences between the sexes — for instance, protective levels of sex hormones, or distinct male-female immune responses. Some even went so far as to test the possibility of treating infected men with estrogen injections.

This focus on biological sex differences turned out to be woefully inadequate, as a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers pointed out earlier this year. By analyzing more than a year of sex-disaggregated COVID-19 data, they showed that the gender gap was more fully explained by social factors like mask-wearing and distancing behaviors (less common among men) and testing rates (higher among pregnant women and health workers, who were largely female).

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ