Tis The Season: What The World Is Drinking

For many corners of the world, the holidays are arriving. And though drinks of course are flowing all over the world, all year long, we wanted to take this moment to look around and raise our glass to 11 places and their spirits of choice.

The Wine and Spirit Research publish a list on global alcohol consumption annually and these figures both reinforce and contradict some of the most popular clichés about people’s drinking habits.

Moldova came in at the top in the most recent study, guzzling down a total of 18.22 liters of pure alcohol per capita. At the other end of the scale were Afghanistan and Yemen.

Do the Russians really love vodka? Is Gin and Tonic the top tipple in London? Who loves whiskey more than the Scots? Where is it easier to get hold of beer than water or soda?

We mapped places with some things you may not have known about their drinking culture…

Photo by Sam Howzit via Flickr

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Geopolitics

​An Egyptian Son's Plea: For​ My Father And Arab Spring Reconciliation

Essam El-Haddad, a senior adviser to President Morsi, was jailed more than eight years ago. His son Abdullah continues to fight for his father's liberation, which he says is a necessary path toward national union in post-Arab Spring Egypt.

Essam El-Haddad appearing in court

Abdullah El-Haddad

-Essay-

CAIRO — My heartbeat quickens as I see my mother's name flash on my phone screen. I stop everything I'm doing and try to remember to breathe. I lift the phone to my ear and brace myself for the bad news that will inevitably come about my father who has been locked in an Egyptian prison for more than eight years. They say things get easier with time, but these phone calls flout that rule. Nothing about them gets easier, especially when I'm receiving them in forced exile.

My father, Essam El-Haddad, was a senior adviser to President Mohammed Morsi. He was received by foreign governments and met with officials around the world. Now, at 67 years old, he languishes in solitary confinement. Despite his failing health, he has been denied medical care, having suffered four heart attacks since his detention. The little we know about my father's circumstances we learned through the rare occasions our family was allowed to visit him by Egypt's prison authorities. These visits have stopped since 2016.

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