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food / travel

The Chicest Sandwich In Paris Is Now Available To Go. If You Can Afford It

Master chef Michel Rostang’s famous truffle sandwiches can now be ordered take out. They cost 65 euros a piece. Are they worth it? One reporter took it upon herself to find out.

Come inside for your haute cuisine to go (Vic Lic)
Come inside for your haute cuisine to go (Vic Lic)
Caroline Sallé

PARIS -- It may not be the healthiest sandwich. And it's certainly not the cheapest. But it has truffles, so for this one time there's no point really in counting calories or euros. Ahh, black truffle from the Rhône Valley or Périgord Valley, minced between two slices of country sourdough bread with a little salted butter. I'm in heaven – until I remember the price: 65 euros ($84).

For some, this signature dish of Michel Rostang, a chef with two Michelin stars to his name, isn't new. What is new is that at the Grande Épicerie du Bon Marché, an upscale super market in Paris' 7th arrondissement, this infamous sandwich is now available for takeout.

Sold from a sophisticated case, slipped inside of an elegant fabric pouch, the sandwich is still protected by cellophane, a much less distinguished aesthetic. Don't expect to sink your teeth immediately into this chic snack. It can only be enjoyed once baked golden, four minutes per slice. In short, for a noontime snack in a corner office, this sandwich is a waste. Especially if all you have at work is a microwave. That would be a faux pas indeed.

Oh well, it will have to wait for the evening. Finally, the awaited hour arrives. The house begins to take on that distinct aroma. Naturally, the whole family gathers in the kitchen. To share? No way. Absolutely out of the question. But I'm outnumbered. In the end I relent, holding back the tears as I cut the sandwich into small pieces. I still manage three mouthfuls: an earthy aroma that clings to the palate, and a strong luxurious aftertaste.

I've learned my lesson. Next time, to enjoy this selfish pleasure, I'll reserve it directly with the chef. A table set for one, s'il vous plaît.

Read the original story in French

Photo - Vic Lic

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LGBTQ Plus

Where Conversion Therapy Is Banned, And Where Its Practices Are Ever More Extreme

After almost five years of promises, the UK government says it will again introduce legislation to ban conversion therapy — and in a policy shift, the proposed law would include therapies designed for transgender people.

Photo of demonstrators in the UK against conversion therapy

The UK Government has finally announced a draft bill to ban conversion therapy for all – including trans people.

Openly via Twitter
Riley Sparks, Ginevra Falciani, Renate Mattar

Conversion therapy, which includes a range of practices that aim to change someone’s sexuality or gender identity, has long been controversial. Many in the LGBTQ community consider it outright evil.

As the practice has spread, often pushed on young people by homophobic family members, there has been a worldwide push to make conversion therapy illegal, with the UK as the latest country set to ban such practices as electric shocks, aversion therapy and a variety of other traumatic, dangerous techniques to try to change someone's sexual preferences or gender identity.

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The British Association for Counseling and Psychotherapy, the professional body which governs therapists in the UK, calls the practice “unethical (and) potentially harmful.”

In France, journalists have documentedmany healthcare professionals offering the pseudoscientific practice. In one case, a self-described “LGBT-friendly” therapist offered to “cure” a young lesbian through so-called "rebirth therapy," a dangerous practice that was banned in some U.S. states after unlicensed therapists killed a 10-year-old girl during a session.

For one Canadian man, therapy included prescription medication and weekly ketamine injections to “correct the error” of his homosexuality, all under the guidance of a licensed psychiatrist. Some people are forced into treatment against their will — often minors — but most of the time, those who receive conversion therapy do so willingly.

The UK announcement of plans to ban conversion therapy for England and Wales comes after four separate British prime ministers had promised, for almost five years, to ban the practice.

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