When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

All smiles
All smiles
Maria Jose Loss

BUENOS AIRES – Felicitas Pizarro’s huge smile is more than just glowing, it's contagious. And now her life and her smile are about to enter radically new territory: Pizarro, a passionate amateur chef, is set to step up to the highest ranks of the foodie world, with the help of none other than British-born culinary superstar Jamie Oliver.

As she’s looking at her upcoming schedule for this fall -- full of live TV slots and plenty of radio -- she says, “I feel like this is happening to someone else, it hasn’t hit me that it’s me who is on TV and on the news.” And soon enough

Felicitas' smile has started to spread beyond her regular circles ever since she recorded her YouTube video from the barbecue in her parent’s house about a month ago when she came across the competition that Oliver was running on Twitter in search of his next rising star.

Pizarro decided to try her luck and was soon chosen as one of the five finalists, and quickly shot to the top of the competition's ranking based on how many “likes” each video got. Her victorious tally was announced at midnight on Sunday.

“Cooking, for me, brings happiness and today I’m in the middle of it all!," she said.

A fan of Jamie Oliver, Felicitas said “I like how he cooks, how he teaches, but more than anything his way of inspiring people. This is what I like most about him. I don’t know him personally and after I sent in the video I realized that at some point he might be sitting in front of a computer watching me cook just like I had done with him!”

The young chef and sommelier who lit up the social networks grew up in an artistic family. Granddaughter of the leader of Los Chalchaleros, an Argentine music ensemble, Juan Carlos Saravia, Felicitas is one chef with no stage fright as she had been recording videos with her sister, Malena, since she was a little girl.

But her calling has always been with the culinary. She speaks of food with passion, always looking for something different, the history of a dish, novel ingredients and the perfect wine to accompany it.

The most striking thing about Felicitas is how she brings what it is any why it matters to the dish. The most enjoyable thing for her is to delight her family and loved ones with her food, to generate sensations and transport the taste to a particular place, from a grandmother’s recipe to childhood, from friends to love and never fail to surprise.

This is the perfect recipe to conquer the public: passion for what you do mixed with perseverance, good humor, bravery, and a pinch of luck.

Felicitas will now be the new star of Food Tube, Jamie Oliver’s video channel. She’ll have her own program to be launched in the coming months, which she’ll record from the very same kitchen where she cooks for her friends and family.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

Why The 'Perfect Storm' Of Iran's Protests May Be Unstoppable

The latest round of anti-regime protests in Iran is different than other in the 40 years of the Islamic Republic: for its universality and boldness, the level of public fury and grief, and the role of women and social media. The target is not some policy or the economy, but the regime itself.

A woman holds a lock of her hair during a London rally to protest the murder of Mahsa Amini in London

Roshanak Astaraki

-Analysis-

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Tehran on Sept. 16, after a possible beating at a police station, has sparked outrage and mass protests in Iran and abroad. There have been demonstrations and a violent attempt to suppress them in more than 100 districts in every province of Iran.

These protests may look like others since 2017, and back even to 1999 — yet we may be facing an unprecedented turning point in Iranians' opposition to the Islamic Republic. Indeed newly installed conservative President Ibrahim Raisi could not have expected such momentum when he set off for a quick trip to New York and back for a meeting of the UN General Assembly.

For one of the mistakes of a regime that takes pride in dismissing the national traditions of Iran is to have overlooked the power of grief among our people.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ