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food / travel

System Rotten To The Core? Man Sues Town In Bid To Become 'Apple Queen'

Apple of discord
Apple of discord
Stuart Richardson

Take a bite out of this juicy scandal.

In eastern Germany, there's a contest for an "Apple Queen", where the title goes to a lady who poses with the produce. For years, the town of Guben has bestowed the honor to a woman but last year, due to a lack of female entrants, local authorities revised the rules to permit men to run for Apple Queen, or in this case, Apple King, reported German daily Süddeutsche Zeitung. Marko Steidel, 42, a local bricklayer and fruit enthusiast, finally got his chance and ran for the contest, but the town still picked a lady — Antonia Lieske, aged 21.

The system, it appears, is rotten to the core.

"The vote was manipulated," Steidel declared. He is now suing the Guben tourism office for what he says were rigged elections. His proof? Lieske doesn't even have a driver's license, which all the previous monarchs have had. A matter of apples and oranges, according to the lawyer for the tourism office, who insisted a driver's license isn't a condition for entry, the paper notes.

The court will announce its verdict on Sept. 7 — which Steidel may decide to a-peel.

There's much at stake: The winner gets a crown and a special parade float. How do you like them apples?

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Society

India Higher Education Inferior Complex: Where Are The Foreign University Campuses?

The proposed UGC guidelines are ill-conceived and populist, and hardly take note of the educational and financial interests of foreign universities.

Image of a group of five people sitting on the grass inside of the Indian Institute of Technology campus.

The IIT - Indian Institute of Technology - Campus

M.M Ansari and Mohammad Naushad Khan

NEW DELHI — Nearly 800,000 young people from India attend foreign universities every year in search of quality education and entrepreneurial training, resulting in a massive outflow of resources – $3 billion – to finance their education. These students look for greener pastures abroad because of the lack of quality teaching and research in most of India’s higher education institutions.

Over 40,000 colleges and 1,000 universities are producing unemployable graduates who cannot function in a knowledge- and technology-intensive economy.

The Indian government's solution is to open doors to foreign universities, with a proposed set of regulations aiming to provide higher education and research services to match global standards, and to control the outflow of resources. But this decision raises many questions.

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