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Apple of discord
Apple of discord
Stuart Richardson

Take a bite out of this juicy scandal.

In eastern Germany, there's a contest for an "Apple Queen", where the title goes to a lady who poses with the produce. For years, the town of Guben has bestowed the honor to a woman but last year, due to a lack of female entrants, local authorities revised the rules to permit men to run for Apple Queen, or in this case, Apple King, reported German daily Süddeutsche Zeitung. Marko Steidel, 42, a local bricklayer and fruit enthusiast, finally got his chance and ran for the contest, but the town still picked a lady — Antonia Lieske, aged 21.

The system, it appears, is rotten to the core.

"The vote was manipulated," Steidel declared. He is now suing the Guben tourism office for what he says were rigged elections. His proof? Lieske doesn't even have a driver's license, which all the previous monarchs have had. A matter of apples and oranges, according to the lawyer for the tourism office, who insisted a driver's license isn't a condition for entry, the paper notes.

The court will announce its verdict on Sept. 7 — which Steidel may decide to a-peel.

There's much at stake: The winner gets a crown and a special parade float. How do you like them apples?

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