food / travel

Ride La Dolce Vita On Southern Europe's Longest Bicycle Trail

Why take the train when you can ride a bicycle? What better way to take in the gorgeous Italian countryside than to ride along the Po River, a route dotted with cathedrals, national parks and beautiful cities.

MILAN – Can you imagine travelling the Italian countryside on a bicycle, riding along the Po River from Venice to Turin?

Engineers from the Polytechnic School of Milan have just presented the ambitious and audacious project to officials across the region: a 679-kilometer cycle track along the Po.

Called "VenTo" (‘Wind" in Italian), a word combining the names of two cities involved: Venice (Venezia) and Turin (Torino), the track would follow the Po riverbanks crossing art cities such as Ferrara, Pavia and Valenza, the countryside as well as national parks. About 15% of the track already exists.

The proposed route is dotted with cathedrals, monasteries and bed and breakfasts. There is a train station every six kilometers from where you can hop on the train with your bike.

The project's creators say the track wouldn't be for tourists only, but could also serve as a real means of transportation. If they manage to convince national and local authorities to spend the 80 million euro needed, the route could be open within the next two years, becoming the longest cycle track in South Europe.

Read more from La Stampa - original article in Italian by Giuseppe Salvaggiulo

Photo – Tim Lucas

*This is a digest item, not a direct translation

Support Worldcrunch
We are grateful for reader support to continue our unique mission of delivering in English the best international journalism, regardless of language or geography. Click here to contribute whatever you can. Merci!
Coronavirus

Texas In Germany? Saxony Mixes Anti-Vaxxers And Far-Right Politics

When it comes to vaccination rates, there are striking parallels between Germany and the United States. The states with the most opposition to vaccines differ politically from those with the highest vaccination rates. Now the consequences for booster shots are starting to become visible, especially in the United States.

A protest in Saxony last year against COVID-19 restrictions

Zentralbild/dpa via ZUMA
Daniel Friedrich Sturm

-Analysis-

WASHINGTON — Ok, so Saxony was singled out last week in a New York Times article as an example of the disastrous vaccination situation in parts of Europe. The article talks about the link between anti-vaxxers and the political success of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party in the eastern German state.

In a sense, Saxony is Germany's Texas. For instance, 59% of U.S. citizens are fully vaccinated, but in strictly Republican Texas, where Donald Trump overwhelmingly won the 2020 election, this figure stands at 54%.

Keep reading... Show less
Support Worldcrunch
We are grateful for reader support to continue our unique mission of delivering in English the best international journalism, regardless of language or geography. Click here to contribute whatever you can. Merci!
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ