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food / travel

McDonald's Lands In Vietnam: History, Capitalism And Obesity

A recently opened McDonald's franchise in Ho Chi Minh City is the first in Vietnam. Symbolism aside, the ubiquitous U.S. fast food chain also raises health questions for Vietnamese.

Opening day for Vietnam's first McDonald's restaurant
Opening day for Vietnam's first McDonald's restaurant
Lien Hoang

HO CHI MINH CITY — With a ribbon cutting and a traditional lion dance, Vietnam recently welcomed the country’s hottest new attraction: the first McDonald’s franchise.

Vietnamese have been waiting for this moment for years. On opening day, 34-year-old businesswoman Lai Thi Tuoi waits in line with hundreds of others for a Big Mac and fries.
“I’ve been to other countries and eaten McDonald’s there,” she says. “So when I heard about it coming here, I was excited. For the grand opening I brought my son to taste it, because he likes things like KFC. Whatever’s new in Vietnam, we should go try it.”

McDonald’s is the first chain in Vietnam to be open 24 hours a day, and the first to have a drive-thru. Most Vietnamese have never used a drive-thru, and its arrival is welcome because they hate standing in line. “The first drive-thru in Vietnam — that sounds pretty special to me,” Tuoi says.

The company’s American CEO, Don Thompson, flew in to Vietnam from the Olympics in Russia, which McDonald’s sponsored. “I’m actually looking forward to potentially riding a scooter through the drive-thru,” he says. “I’ve never done that anywhere in the world.”

Vietnam is now the 38th country in Asia to have a McDonald’s. And the Ho Chi Minh City restaurant is the region’s 10,000th location. McDonald’s has also invented a new sandwich for Vietnam, as franchisee Henry Nguyen explains.

“Pork is such a staple of our diets here in Vietnam,” he says. “We wanted to make sure that we had a product that everyone could also enjoy that was pork-based. For this restaurant, for Vietnam, we created McPork. We hope it will not only be consumed and enjoyed in Vietnam, but we hope over time it’s going to be enjoyed around the world.”

Even the U.S. ambassador to Vietnam, David Shear, was at the opening ceremony to give a speech. “McDonald’s will not only serve great food, but it will establish a first-rate Vietnamese supplier network,” he said. “It will build a world-class supply chain, and train the next generation of Vietnam’s great managers and corporate leaders.”

But not everyone is happy about the arrival of McDonald’s, saying that this will only add to Vietnam’s rising obesity rates and diabetes. Naturally, that’s a claim senior vice president Bob Larson denies. “We offer a very nutritious, well-balanced range of products,” he says.

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Society

End Of Roe v. Wade, The World Is Watching

As the Supreme Court decides to overturn the 1973 decision that guaranteed abortion rights, many fear an imminent threat to abortion rights in the U.S. But in other countries, the global fight for sexual and reproductive rights is going in different directions.

"Don't abort my right" At 2019 pro-choice march In Toulouse, France.

Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via ZUMA
Hannah Steinkopf-Frank and Sophia Constantino

PARIS — Nearly 50 years after it ensured the right to abortion to Americans, the United States Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade case, meaning that millions of women in the U.S. may lose their constitutional right to abortion.

The groundbreaking decision is likely to set off a range of restrictions on abortion access in multiple states in the U.S., half of which are expected to implement new bans on the procedure. Thirteen have already passed "trigger laws" that will automatically make abortion illegal.

U.S. President Joe Biden called the ruling "a tragic error" and urged individual states to enact laws to allow the procedure.

In a country divided on such a polarizing topic, the decision is likely to cause major shifts in American law and undoubtedly spark outrage among the country’s pro-choice groups. Yet the impact of such a momentous shift, like others in the United States, is also likely to reverberate around the world — and perhaps, eventually, back again in the 50 States.

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