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RUE89 (France)

Good news: beer does not give you beer belly! Although we've been led to believe there was a direct correlation between beer and abdominal obesity, a group of very serious scientists from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden discovered that beer is not responsible for our beer guts.

The Swedish researchers went to Germany (where else?) to conduct their study. More than 20,000 Germans volunteered to for the research. Each volunteer was weighed and their waist and hips were measured. They also had to answer a questionnaire about their beer drinking habits. From there, various categories were created, from "abstinent" to "moderate" (more than 250 ml per day) to "heavy drinker" (between 500 ml to 1 liter per day).

The result is absolutely clear: "To drink beer leads to an increase in fat on the whole body," Rue 89 reports. The good news is that beer is not to blame if you have an imposing belly but no fat anywhere else. The bad news is that beer is still fattening.

But this very serious study doesn't take into account other criteria --what the subjects were eating, for instance. The Swedish scientists should nevertheless be included in the running for an Ig Nobel Prize, which rewards the most improbable research around the world.

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Geopolitics

The Xi-Putin Alliance Is Dead, Long Live The Xi-Putin Alliance

The façade of unity between Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin was lifted in Uzbekistan last week. But where exactly does the Chinese head of state stand on the Russian invasion of Ukraine? Beijing is still establishing its place in the world, and it remains in contradiction to the West

China's President Xi Jinping, Uzbekistan's President Shavkat Mirziyoyev and Russia's President Vladimir Putin during the 22nd Summit of the SCO

Gregor Schwung

-Analysis-

Xi Jinping is not out of practice. The Chinese President's public demeanor on his first foreign trip since January 2020 was as confident as ever. When meeting Russian President Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summit in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, he promptly removed his mask and stood inches away from the Russian president, smiling affably.

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What looked routine to the outside world was a diplomatic tightrope walk that the Chinese leader felt compelled to perform. It was the first face-to-face meeting between the two leaders since February, when they proclaimed a "friendship without borders" at the Winter Olympics in Beijing. Shortly thereafter, Putin launched his campaign against Ukraine – and the world wondered whether Putin had used his Olympic visit to obtain Xi's approval for his invasion.

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