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STUFF, TV3, ONE NEWS, NEW ZEALAND HERALD, AUCKLAND NOW (New Zealand)

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AUCKLAND – An award-winning filmmaker was killed in a shark attack on Wednesday at a popular surfing beach west of New Zealand’s largest city.

Muriwai beach on Auckland's west coast has been closed after a fatal shark attack: ow.ly/i52Gv

— nzherald (@nzherald) February 27, 2013

Adam Strange, 46, whose short film won the Crystal Bear at the Berlin Film Festival, was swimming alone 200 meters offshore from Muriwai Beach, near Auckland, when he was attacked by a four-meter-long shark – believed to be a great white – according to Stuff news website.

Fisherman Pio Moses told Stuff: "All of a sudden... we saw the shark fin and next minute, boom, attack him then blood every where on the water.” Moses called emergency services while his friend ran for help. "I yelled at him to swim to the rocks. There was blood everywhere. The water was red. It's pretty scary," said Moses.

Around 200 people were on the beach, and people quickly ran, said Auckland Now. "Everybody was evacuated from the water. Word of mouth, "shark", and everybody left the water,” said student Stef McCallum.

An Eagle helicopter was quickly dispatched to the area, with police officers shooting at the shark, said the New Zealand Herald. A police officer was also able to fire around 20 shots from a lifeguard boat. The shark was hit, but managed to swim away.

TV3 reported that as many as four sharks may have been involved in the attacks, and that neighboring beaches had been closed. Helicopters will patrol the area and lifeguards will have a strong presence, said Auckland Now.

The police have asked us to close Muriwai Regional Park. We expect it to be closed for the next few days.

— Auckland Council (@aklcouncil) February 27, 2013

Shark attacks are very rare – there have been only 14 recorded fatal shark attacks in New Zealand since 1837. There are around two non-deadly attacks a year.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Ukraine War Sparks Divisions Among Israel's Russian Population

Russian speakers represent 15% of the Israeli population. And now, the war in Ukraine is bringing long-simmering tensions in their community to the surface.

At a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in Tel Aviv

Catherine Dupeyron

ISRAEL — Tatiana was born in Russia, but her heart is with Ukraine — and not only because she has been married for 20 years to Alon Gour, who is from Kyiv.

"As soon as Putin came to power in 2000, I campaigned against him. He is a KGB officer and there are no good people in the KGB," explains the 59-year-old from Khabarovsk, a city 8,200 kilometers (5,100 miles) from Moscow and 1,000 km (620 miles) from the Sea of Japan.

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Tatiana, who is not Jewish, came to Israel in 1999. Since the beginning of the war in Ukraine, she and her husband spend every evening and every Shabbat looking after Ukrainian refugees who have arrived in Israel, and sending whatever they can to Ukraine. In their apartment in Kfar Saba, north of Tel Aviv, boxes ready for departure are stacked in every corner. Above the bookcase of the living room, two flags are intertwined: one in the colors of Israel, the other those of Ukraine.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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