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GRANMA (Cuba), AP

Worldcrunch

HAVANA - Cuba’s Foreign Ministry has announced that it will no longer require its citizens to apply for an exit permit before travelling abroad.

Starting January 14 next year, Cubans will no longer have to go through a lengthy and expensive process - citizens have to pay between $150 and $200 for an exit visa and dissidents are often denied their exit visa applications.

Under the new regulations, travelers will only have to present a valid passport and an entry visa for the country where they are headed.

The decision to ease travel restrictions, published in the Communist Party official news site Granma, reads: "As part of the work under way to update the current migratory policy and adjust it to the conditions of the present and the foreseeable future, the Cuban government, in exercise of its sovereignty, has decided to remove the procedure of the exit visa for travel to the exterior."

The measure also extends the amount of time Cubans can remain abroad to 24 months, and they can request an extension when that runs out. Currently, Cubans lose residency and other rights after 11 months overseas, AP reports.

The move is part of the reforms promised by Cuban President Raul Castro when he took office in 2008 as he pledged to do away with unnecessary restrictions.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

"Welcome To Our Hell..." Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba Speaks

In a rare in-depth interview, Ukraine's top diplomat didn't hold back as he discussed NATO, E.U. candidacy, and the future of the war with Russia. He also reserves a special 'thank you' for Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi.

Dmytro Kuleba, Foreign Minister of Ukraine attends the summit of foreign ministers of the G7 group of leading democratic economic powers.

Oleg Bazar

KYIV — This is the first major interview Ukrainian Minister of Foreign Affairs Dmytro Kuleba has given. He spoke to the Ukrainian publication Livy Bereg about NATO, international assistance and confrontation with Russia — on the frontline and in the offices of the European Parliament.

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At 41, Kuleba is the youngest ever foreign minister of Ukraine. He is the former head of the Commission for Coordination of Euro-Atlantic Integration and initiated Ukraine's accession to the European Green Deal. The young but influential pro-European politician is now playing a complicated political game in order to attract as many foreign partners as possible to support Ukraine not only in the war, but also when the war ends.

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