When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

food / travel

Counterfeit Wine In China: Can You Smell That Fake Bordeaux?

As wine grows in popularity with a new Chinese elite, some shady sellers are hocking "French" wine made with artificial flavors and colors. But the labels look great!

Some bottles of the real stuff
Some bottles of the real stuff

Worldcrunch NEW BITES

SHANGAI – China's unmatched counterfeiting skills seemed to reach a new peak with the recent discovery of an entirely fake Apple Store in Kunming. But other shady salesmen are now taking the faking in another high-end direction: the counterfeiting of vintage French wines.

Industry experts says more and more "French wine," whose actual origins are yet to be determined, is being sold in Chinese supermarkets. The products are blended with sweet water, coloring and even artificial flavors. Still they are listed under the name of "Vin de Bordeaux."

Some have even been sold under the name of a prestigious 30-year-old vintage wine. "There are more bottles of 1982 Chateau Lafite in China than were ever produced in France," quips Romain Vandevoorde, a Beijing-based wine importer. In other instances, unscrupulous salesmen sell ordinary French Bordeaux at a tremendously high price usually reserved for Grands Crus Classés.

Wine is growing in popularity in China, hand in hand with the country's expanding economy. Last year, Hong Kong and China represented the leading destinations for Bordeaux wines.

Read the full original article in French by Julie Desné

Photo - antociano

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

A Decisive Spring? How Ukraine Plans To Beat Back Putin's Coming Offensive

The next months will be decisive in the war between Moscow and Kyiv. From the forests of Polesia to Chernihiv and the Black Sea, Ukraine is looking to protect the areas that may soon be the theater of Moscow's announced offensive. Will this be the last Russian Spring?

Photo of three ​Ukrainian soldiers in trenches near Bakhmut, Ukraine

Ukrainian soldiers in trenches near Bakhmut, Ukraine

Anna Akage

Ukrainian forces are digging new fortifications and preparing battle plans along the entire frontline as spring, and a probable new Russian advance, nears.

But this may be the last spring for occupying Russian forces.

"Spring and early summer will be decisive in the war. If the great Russian offensive planned for this time fails, it will be the downfall of Russia and Putin," said Vadym Skibitsky, the deputy head of Ukrainian military intelligence.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

Skinitysky added that Ukraine believes Russia is planning a new offensive in the spring or early summer. The Institute for the Study of War thinks that such an offensive is more likely to come from the occupied territories of Luhansk and Donetsk than from Belarus, as some have feared.

Still, the possibility of an attack by Belarus should not be dismissed entirely — all the more so because, in recent weeks, a flurry of MiG fighter jet activity in Belarusian airspace has prompted a number of air raid alarms throughout Ukraine.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest