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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

World Front Pages As Ukraine Marks Independence Day & 6 Months Of War

Ukraine is marking a somber independence day that coincides with the six-month milestone of the Russian invasion. Here’s how newspapers around the world are covering the event.

Photo of a woman walking in Kyiv next to a disused Russian tank

Walking in Kyiv next to a disused Russian tank

Every year on August 24, Ukraine celebrates its 1991 independence from the Soviet Union. The anniversary of the peaceful transition is traditionally marked by military parades and other displays of patriotic pride across the country.

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But this year, celebrations will be subdued, as the event coincides with the grim milestone of six months since Russia launched its large-scale invasion of the country.


With the conflict at an impasse and the specter of renewed Russian attacks looming over Ukraine, here's how newspapers across the world are covering the six-month milestone:

POLAND - Gazeta Wyborcza


“A parade of Russian wrecks” — Gazeta Wyborcza

THE NETHERLANDS - De Volkskrant


"Hit hard, grown strong” —De Volkskrant

GREECE - E Kathimerini


"Fights on Independence Day" - E Kathimerini

BELGIUM - Le Soir


"How the Ukraine invasion shook the world” - Le Soir

GERMANY - Rheinische Post


“6 months of war” — Rheinische Post

LUXEMBOURG - Luxemburger Wort


"Death, suffering and destruction” — Luxemburger Wort

SWITZERLAND - Tages-Anzeiger


"6 months of war: Kyiv afraid on its national holiday” — Tages-Anzeiger

AUSTRIA - Kleine Zeitung


"Six months of war: the grueling struggle for freedom” — Kleine Zeitung

FRANCE - Libération


“6 months of conflict in Ukraine: Life in war” — Libération

PORTUGAL - Público


"“The war that was supposed to be quick has now been going on for six months” — Público

U.S. - USA Today


USA TODAY

CANADA - The National Post

The National Post

CANADA - The Toronto Star


The Toronto Star

COLOMBIA - El Espectador


“No wind of peace” — El Espectador

MEXICO -


"Half a year at war” — Diario 24 Horas


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Society

Poland's "Family Values" Obsession Squashes The Rights Of The Individual

Poland's political parties across the spectrum prioritize the family in every area of life, which has a detrimental effect on everything from social services to women. But the state should support a dignified life for every citizen, not just those who in long-term unions.

Photo of an empty stroller in the middle of a crowded square in Warsaw, Poland

In Warsaw, Poland

Piotr Szumlewicz

-OpEd-

WARSAW — Social policy in Poland means family. Both left and right, major parties boast that they support the idea of family, act in the favor of families, and make sure that families are safe.

Everyone seems to have forgotten that, according to Article 32 of the Polish Constitution, "everyone is equal before the law" and "everyone has the right to equal treatment by public authorities."

What's more, "no one shall be discriminated against in political, social or economic life for any reason." In other words, the state should take care of all citizens, regardless of whether they live alone or are part of large families, have childless marriages or informal unions.

Unfortunately, for many years, Polish state policy has been moving in a completely different direction. The subject of government social policy is not the individual, but the traditional family. Even sadder: this policy is also supported by the entire parliamentary opposition. This actually means supporting Christian Democrat social policies that discriminate against women, single people, or those living in informal relationships.

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