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Hurricane Isaac Zeroes In On New Orleans Seven Years After Katrina

USA TODAY, CNN, NEW YORK TIMES (USA)

Worldcrunch

NEW ORLEANS - Hurricane Isaac made a second landfall in Louisiana early Wednesday with strong winds and torrential rains, providing the first real test of flood control systems and emergency services in New Orleans on the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

The storm first hit Port Fouchon at 3:15 a.m. EST, around 60 miles southwest of New Orleans, unleashing damaging 80 mile-per-hour winds and drenching coastal cities in Louisiana and Mississippi, reports USA Today.

Moving at an estimated speed of 8-miles-per-hour, Isaac could dump up to 20 inches of rain in some areas and cause major flooding, adds CNN. According to the hurricane centre, Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana could see peak surges of 12 feet.

Yet all eyes are on the New Orleans levee system, which was rebuilt and reinforced at a cost of $14 billion after it failed when Katrina struck in 2005.

Isaac will also be a test for the preparedness of the city's officials, exactly seven years after one of the costliest natural disasters in the U.S. history, in which some 1,800 died.

“We are officially in the fight, and #nola is on the front lines”, tweeted New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu.

Isaac was upgraded from tropical storm to Category 1 hurricane earlier Tuesday.

Isaac killed 29 people when it hit Haiti and the Dominican Republic but left little damage in Key West, Florida, reports The New York Times.

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Geopolitics

How Ukraine Keeps Getting The West To Flip On Arms Supplies

The open debate on weapon deliveries to Ukraine is highly unusual, but Kyiv has figured out how to use the public moral suasion — and patience — to repeatedly shift the question in its favor. But will it work now for fighter jets?

Photo of a sunset over the USS Nimitz with a man guiding fighter jets ready for takeoff

U.S fighter jets ready for takeoff on the USS Nimitz

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — In what other war have arms deliveries been negotiated so openly in the public sphere?

On Monday, a journalist asked Joe Biden if he plans on supplying F-16 fighter jets to Ukraine. He answered “No”. A few hours later, the same question was asked to Emmanuel Macron, about French fighter jets. Macron did not rule it out.

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Visiting Paris on Tuesday, Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksïï Reznikov recalled that a year ago, the United States had refused him ground-air Stinger missiles deliveries. Eleven months later, Washington is delivering heavy tanks, in addition to everything else. The 'no' of yesterday is the green light of tomorrow: this is the lesson that the very pragmatic minister seemed to learn.

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