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AP, U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT (USA)

Worldcrunch

WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was admitted to a New York hospital on Sunday, after the discovery of a blood clot stemming from a concussion she suffered earlier this month, reports the AP.

#SecClinton is being treated for a blood clot stemming from a concussion sustained several weeks ago. go.usa.gov/gMaQ

— StateDept (@StateDept) December 31, 2012

“In the course of a follow-up exam today, Secretary Clinton's doctors discovered a blood clot had formed, stemming from the concussion she sustained several weeks ago. She is being treated with anti-coagulants and is at New York Presbyterian Hospital so that they can monitor the medication over the next 48 hours,” said the State Department on Sunday.

“Her doctors will continue to assess her condition, including other issues associated with her concussion. They will determine if any further action is required.”

Clinton suffered a concussion in mid-December, after she fell at home, where she was recovering from a stomach virus.

“The seriousness of a blood clot "depends on where it is," Dr. Gholam Motamedi, a neurologist at Georgetown University Medical Center who was not involved in Clinton's care, ” told the AP.

Clots in the legs are a common risk after someone has been bedridden and are treated with six months of blood thinners to allow them to dissolve on their own and to prevent further clots from forming, he said.

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Sabotage, Desertions, Gamers? Why It's Getting Harder For Iran To Squash Protests

Faced with the resilience of the national protests, Iran's security forces are now facing unusual acts of sabotage on state installations, and clerical authorities have started to wonder which of their loyalist forces can be firmly relied on still to defend the regime.

Photo of protests in Iran

Screenshot of video

Kayhan-London

Ten weeks into the nationwide anti-state uprising in Iran, the regime's security agencies face a crisis driven by four key factors: 1. Losses among the ranks through disobedience, desertion or negligence on the streets; 2. insufficient forces because of casualties from clashes; 3. rising number of acts of subversion and sabotage, especially targeting strategic installations; 4. cyber-attacks and security traps laid from abroad.

At the same time, the Iranian regime is facing an apparent change of tactics among protesters compared to previous rounds of unrest, which is particular to the new generations involved in this movement. Senior officials of the Revolutionary Guards corps — the body effectively coordinating the repression — say the protesters are mostly aged between 15 and 25 years.

It is a kind of Gen-Z brigade working with older and experienced protesters who led previous rounds of protests in 2009, and especially 2017 and 2019 when public unrest reemerged with particular vigor.

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