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George H.W. Bush In Intensive Care

REUTERS, CNN

Worldcrunch

HOUSTON - Former President George H.W. Bush has been in a Houston hospital for more than a month, and in intensive care since Sunday, a family spokesman has revealed.

He has been in the intensive care unit at Methodist Hospital since Sunday, spokesman Jim McGrath told CNN late Wednesday.

Bush is in guarded condition and is on a liquid diet that took effect with his transfer to the ICU, but McGrath could not offer more details about the reasons for the liquid diet.

At 88, Bush is the oldest living former president, having served from 1989 to 1993. He is the father of George W. Bush.

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Bush with Obama in 2010 (White House/Pete Souza)

Bush was first hospitalized November 7-19, and then was readmitted to Houston Methodist Hospital on November 23. Bush has lower body Parkinsonism, which causes a loss of balance, and has used wheelchairs for more than a year, McGrath said in an email to Reuters.

Himself the son of a senator, Bush also served as a congressman, ambassador to the United Nations, envoy to China, CIA director and Ronald Reagan's vice president.

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Society

Tour Of Istanbul's Ancient Yedikule Gardens, At Risk With Urban Restoration

The six-hectare gardens in the center of Istanbul, which are more than 1,500 years old, have helped feed the city's residents over the centuries and are connected with its religious history. But current city management has a restoration project that could disrupt a unique urban ecosystem.

Photo of Muslims performing Friday prayer in the garden of Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul.

Last March, Muslims performing Friday prayer in the garden of Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul.

Tolga Ildun via ZUMA Press Wire
Canan Coşkun

ISTANBUL — The historic urban gardens of Yedikule in Istanbul are at risk of destruction once again. After damage in 2013 caused by the neighborhood municipality of Fatih, the gardens are now facing further disruption and possible damage as the greater Istanbul municipality plans more "restoration" work.

The six-hectare gardens are more than 1,500 years old, dating back to the city's Byzantine era. They were first farmed by Greeks and Albanians, then people from the northern city of Kastamonu, near the Black Sea. Now, a wide variety of seasonal produce grows in the garden, including herbs, varieties of lettuce and other greens, red turnip, green onion, cabbage, cauliflower, tomato, pepper, corn, mullberry, fig and pomegranate.

Yedikule is unique among urban gardens around the world, says Cemal Kafadar, a historian and professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University.

“There are (urban gardens) that are older than Istanbul gardens, such as those in Rome, but there is no other that has maintained continuity all this time with its techniques and specific craft," Kafadar says. "What makes Yedikule unique is that it still provides crops. You might have eaten (from these gardens) with or without knowing about it."

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