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European Business Schools Look To Expand Into Another Developing Country: USA

After European campuses open in China and India, a top French business school has set up shop on the North Carolina State University campus to give its students a shot at American jobs. Other European institutions hope to follow.

Jean-Claude Lewandowski

After China, then India and the emerging countries, the US could now be the latest territory coveted by European business schools. The French school EDHEC plans to open a US site, just as the Spanish IESE did last year, and others hope to follow. But the School of Knowledge Economy and Management, known as SKEMA, is one step ahead. In partnership with North Carolina State University (NCSU), they have set up their own site on the 35 square kilometer (14 square miles), NCSU campus in Raleigh. This is a first for a French school.

SKEMA is the result of a merger of two French schools, ESC in Lille and CERAM in Sophia-Antipolis, France's version of Silicon Valley. A building on the NCSU campus was entirely renovated to house the new school and its 250 students. It features two square kilometers of state-of-the-art classrooms equipped with interactive whiteboards, an automatic podcasting system, touch screen computers and a videoconference system. The school collaborates with Microsoft, benefiting from its latest teaching aids. Even the chairs, which can be linked together for small meetings, come directly from the laboratories of the international office furniture company Steelcase. The group has invested a total of two million euros. The NCSU campus is close to the Research Triangle Park, the largest science and technology park in the US and the second most prominent high-tech research and development center after Silicon Valley.

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Society

The Ideal Age To Marry? Reflections Of A 20-Something Indian Woman

India is raising the minimum age for women to marry. What does that mean on the individual level (with your parents whispering in your ear)?

A couple holding hands after marriage

Priyamvada Rana

-Essay-

NEW DELHI — A few days ago, I got a call from my parents, who wanted to talk about the "ideal age to marry." This came after news about India raising the minimum age for women to marry to 21, to match the age for men. It's a laudable move, sure, but I even wonder if 21-year-olds will be able to fathom the expectations, responsibilities and limitations that come with such a socially-constrained institution.

I am not ready at 26, and won’t be even at 30.

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