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BBC, AFP, CBS

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GROVELAND — Firefighters are still struggling to contain the intense wildfire raging north of Yosemite National Park in California. Some 2,800 firefighters are battling the so-called Rim Fire, which covers 133,980 acres.

Yosemite Park spokesman Tom Medena told CBS News that the fire is edging closer to the source of San Francisco’s famously pure drinking water, known as the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. Californian Governor Jerry Brown has declared a state of emergency for the city, as the reservoir supplies the city with 85% of its water.

InciWeb (Incident Information System, which monitors fires in the western U.S.) reported that the fire was just seven percent contained. “It remained fairly active overnight in most all divisions,” the website added, and it showed “rapid rates of spread, torching and spotting” on its eastern edge.

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Photo: Elias Funez - Modesto Bee/ZUMA

It “is expected to continue to exhibit very large fire growth due to extremely dry fuels and inaccessible terrain,” according to InciWeb.

The BBC reports that the flames remain 20 miles away from Yosemite’s main tourist area. The park authorities thus have no plans to close as most of it is unaffected by the fire, though areas on the park’s northwestern edge have been closed throughout the week.

Investigators are trying to determine how the fire started Aug. 17 at Stanislaus National Forest, which, along with Yosemite, is the state’s primary natural tourist attraction. The Rim Fire is the most critical of a dozen burning across California.

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Economy

In Uganda, Having A "Rolex" Is About Not Going Hungry

Experts fear the higher food prices resulting from the conflict in Ukraine could jeopardize the health of many Ugandans. Take a look at this ritzy-named simple dish.

Zziwa Fred, a street vendor who runs two fast-food businesses in central Uganda, rolls a freshly prepared chapati known as a Rolex.

Nakisanze Segawa

WAKISO — Godfrey Kizito takes a break from his busy shoe repair shop every day so he can enjoy his favorite snack, a vegetable and egg omelet rolled in a freshly prepared chapati known as a Rolex. But for the past few weeks, this daily ritual has given him neither the satisfaction nor the sustenance he is used to consuming. Kizito says this much-needed staple has shrunk in size.

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Most streets and markets in Uganda have at least one vendor firing up a hot plate ready to cook the Rolex, short for rolled eggs — which usually comes with tomatoes, cabbage and onion and is priced anywhere from 1,000 to 2,000 Ugandan shillings (28 to 57 cents). Street vendor Farouk Kiyaga says many of his customers share Kizito’s disappointment over the dwindling size of Uganda’s most popular street food, but Kiyaga is struggling with the rising cost of wheat and cooking oil.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has halted exports out of the two countries, which account for about 26% of wheat exports globally and about 80% of the world’s exports of sunflower oil, pushing prices to an all-time high, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization, a United Nations agency. Not only oil and wheat are affected. Prices of the most consumed foods worldwide, such as meat, grains and dairy products, hit their highest levels ever in March, making a nutritious meal even harder to buy for those who already struggle to feed themselves and their families. The U.N. organization warns the conflict could lead to as many as 13.1 million more people going hungry between 2022 and 2026.

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