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India

Zen And The Temple Of Motorcyle Mania

An Indian shrine built in memory of a dead traveler and his motorbike has attracted prayerful followers who credit the unusual temple for all manner of good tidings.

The Royal Enfield of Om Banna
The Royal Enfield of Om Banna
Jasvinder Sehgal

JODHPUR — Kala Saini is singing a lullaby for her 8-month-old daughter, who was born after the couple had been married for eight years. Kala says the wish for a baby came true after praying at the Om Banna temple near Jodhpur, in the Indian state of Rajasthan.

But the temple isn’t that kind of temple. Built along a busy highway infamous for fatal accidents, it’s a shrine to a motorcycle and its dead owner, Om Banna. The shrine has the motorbike inside a glass box with a photo of the owner.

Pug Singh has been looking after the shrine for the last two decades. “In 1991, Om Banna was returning home on his motorcyle when he suddenly hit a tree,” Singh says. “He was killed on the spot. After his death, the motorbike was taken to a local police station. But the next day, it was found again back at the accident point.”

Singh explains that the police thought it as a prank, so they took the bike to the police station again. “But on the following day, the same thing happened,” he says. Apparently, Om Banna’s father had a dream in which his dead son asked him to build a temple for his motorcycle.

People who visit the shrine sing folk songs in the name of Om Banna and offer prayers to the bike. Legend has it that paying respects here at the temple will ensure safe travels, says visitor Kala Saini.

“If they don't honk the horn, they will definitely meet an accident and will never reach their destination,” she says of passersby.

Nirbhay Singh Rathod and his wife traveled over 100 miles to pray here. He wants their son to marry soon. “It all depends upon your faith and belief,” he says. “I believe in the Motorcycle god and the holy spirit. I come here to invite the holy spirit to my son’s marriage.”

Near the shrine, there’s a tree covered with some offerings such as coconuts, sweets and flowers. Many visitors tie strings around the tree and put their wishes there with the hope that their dreams will come true.

Rukmani Devi sells the strings to customers. “The motorcycle driver died after hitting this tree,” he says. “So when you tie a wish band on the same tree, your wishes will come true.”

Truck driver Rishpal Singh says he is now a regular visitor to the temple. “One of my friend's vehicles got punctured and his vehicle was jammed,” the truck driver says. “It must be because he didn’t pray here.”

Kala Saini says praying at the motorbike shrine has changed her family’s life. She now plans to bring her baby daughter to the temple someday.

“I will come here again, but this time with my full family. But the Motorcycle god should fulfill my wish. “

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Ideas

"Collateral Benefit": Could Putin's Launching A Failed War Make The World Better?

Consider the inverse of "collateral damage." Envision Russia's defeat and the triumph of a democratic coalition offers reflection on the most weighty sense of costs and benefits.

Photo of a doll representing Russian President Vladimir Putin

Demonstrators holding a doll with a picture of Russian President Putin

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — The concept of collateral damage has developed in the course of so-called "asymmetrical” wars, fought between opponents considered unequal.

The U.S. drone which targeted rebel fighters in Afghanistan, and annihilated an entire family gathered for a wedding, appears to be the perfect example of collateral damage: a doubtful military gain, and a certain political cost. One might also consider the American bombing of Normandy towns around June 6, 1944 as collateral damage.

But is it possible to reverse the expression, and speak of "collateral benefits"? When applied to an armed conflict, the expression may seem shocking.

No one benefits from a war, which leaves in its trace a trail of dead, wounded and displaced people, destroyed cities or children brutally torn from their parents.

And yet the notion of "collateral benefits" is particularly applicable to the war that has been raging in Ukraine for almost a year.

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