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Society

Zelensky, Global Icon: Memes, Magazine Covers And What It Really Means

Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky has instantly become an international icon of courage in the fight for freedom. This sudden fame is as much a proof of how much is at stake in Ukraine as any one man's power — and Zelensky is the first to know his limits.

Zelensky, Global Icon: Memes, Magazine Covers And What It Really Means

Volodymyr Zelensky in the streets of Kyiv with his government cabinet just after the start of the Russian invasion.

Laure Gautherin

“I need ammunition, not a ride..."

It was just one of many phrases, perhaps the most Hollywood among them, that have turned Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky into an international icon. Indeed, it only took a few hours before t-shirts printed with these words — uttered in response to the U.S. offer to evacuate him to safety — and the yellow-and-blue flag were being sold on Amazon for $19.95.

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With such instant global passion around him, one could almost forget that the comedian-turned-president had often looked overmatched to the eyes of the world, from his election in 2019 to his bit part in the Donald Trump impeachment saga, up until the hours before threat of a Russian invasion became real.


But then came his first video the night after Russia's invasion began, in which he addresses his people and the world, saying he and his fellow government ministers were "present" in Kyiv, and that Ukraine would not yield before their bigger neighbor.

"Captain Ukraine"

Internet political messages

His every new word is closely monitored, his past speeches dug up – like his inaugural speech which did not make headlines outside of the country at the time – his selfie videos, on the ground, anticipated like the next blockbuster. His face on front pages and magazine covers around the globe. (See below)

If President Zelensky's bravery is helping keep the spotlight on the conflict ravaging the country he made the oath to protect, the hero tag that comes with his determination is alone not a strategy for winning the war.

“What we see in studying memes and politics is that while memification helps a political message or cause spread to many people, it often comes at the expense of a flattening of that story,” explains Sulafa Zidani, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor specializing in digital culture studies, to Wired.

But it is Zelensky himself who understands this best, noting the risks in how his image is being used. “It's very serious. It's not a movie,” he told Reuters and CNN during an exclusive interview. “I'm not iconic, I think Ukraine is iconic.”

Indeed, digging back into his pre-war archive, we see he understood this truth even then. More than an icon, Volodymyr Zelensky is a real person.


The Toronto Star (Canada)

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of Sunday Star

Courrier picard (France) 

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of Courrier picard

Daily Mirror (UK)

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of Daily Mirror

New York Post (U.S.) 

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of New York Post

Le Point (France)

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of Le Point

L'Express (France)

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of L'Express

Metro (UK) 

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of Metro

The New Statesman (UK)

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of The

Vanity Fair (Italy)

Volodymyr Zelensky on the front page of Vanity Fait Italy

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Russia

No Putin, No Russia? Why Losing The War Wouldn't Destroy The Russian Federation

Predictions about the collapse of Russia are as old as the country itself. Yet a consistent centralization of power has gone on for decades, weakening Russia's territories and republics. The war in Ukraine changes everything and nothing.

Photo of a Russian flag during Unity Day celebrations

Russian unity day celebrations

Aleksandr Kynev

-Analysis-

The prediction “Russia is about to fall apart” has been a mainstay of the political science-futurist genre for the 30 years since the end of the USSR and establishment of the Russian Federation.

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Now, the war with Ukraine has drastically reduced the time-frame for such apocalyptic forecasts to come true. First, because it turns out that Russia can very well lose the war; and secondly, a defeat would weaken Vladimir Putin’s regime — and who knows if he will retain power at all?

“No Putin, no Russia” is a more recent refrain.

This line of thinking says that the weakening of the central government will push the regions to act independently. Yet noted political scientist Alexander Kynev explained in an interview with Vazhnyye Istorii why he doesn't believe anything like this will happen. The collapse of Russia is unlikely even if Putin loses.

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