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Switzerland

Work From Home, Or Live At The Office?

As boundaries between work and private life fall away, telecommuting has been a rising trend in recent years. But some now have begun to opt for living at work.

Nap time first. Stay the night is next...
Nap time first. Stay the night is next...
Ghislaine Bloch

LAUSANNE — "I live in my office," a somewhat embarrassed Virginie Le Moigne admits. As head of the Swiss agency My Playground, a communications and media relations company that employs seven people, she set up a sofa bed in her conference room and regularly spends nights there. "My husband, a designer, and my 2-year-old daughter join me," the 37-year-old adds.

The living conditions are pleasant. Her company is located in the Marie-Antoinette Villa, a 20th century property in Lausanne"s chic Rumine neighborhood. Her office looks like a huge showroom, presenting all kinds of objects My Playground has promoted. Contemporary paintings decorate the walls of this apartment-office. "I wouldn't sleep in an open-space-style office," says Le Moigne, who enjoys changing things up. "I like waking up on Saturday mornings to go and have a brunch in town. Not being linked to just one home is a way to be freer."

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Ideas

García Márquez And Truth: How Journalism Fed The Novelist's Fantasy

In his early journalistic writings, the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez showed he had an eye for factual details, in which he found the absurdity and 'magic' that would in time be the stuff and style of his fiction.

Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez reads his book

J. D. Torres Duarte

BOGOTÁ — In short stories written in the 1940s and early 50s and later compiled in Eyes of a Blue Dog, the late Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia's Nobel Prize-winning novelist, shows he is as yet a young writer, with a style and subjects that can be atypical.

Stylistically, García Márquez came into his own in the celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude. Until then both his style and substance took an erratic course: touching the brevity of film scripts in Nobody Writes to the Colonel, technical experimentation in Leaf Storm, the anecdotal short novel in In Evil Hour or exploring politics in Big Mama's Funeral. Throughout, the skills he displayed were rather of a precocious juggler.

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