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Wim Wenders Following The Footsteps Of Pina Bausch

The German director talks about his new film on the work of the late German choreographer, Pina Bausch. Capturing the creative genius -- and mystery -- of one of the 20th century’s great artists. And doing it in 3D.

Ariane Bavelier

They both had the same taste for radical experiences, and the same fear of words. "Me and her, we couldn't trust the past," Wim Wenders says. "We always had to discover things on our own. So when I saw Café Muller 20 years ago, I had to admit -- even as a man who had always rejected dancing -- that Pina said more about the relationship between men and women in 40 minutes than a thousand hours of cinema ever could."

It was after this encounter that Wenders had the idea of a film on Pina Bausch that would focus on her way of looking at things, on her capacity to make body movements express human relations in their most profound and precise form.

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War In Ukraine, Day 85: Russia’s "Smaller" Operations And Shrinking Ambitions

U.S. Department of Defense officials report that instead of the typical battalion tactical groups in Ukraine, which number several hundred soldiers, the Russians have now shifted to attacks by smaller units.

Ukrainian soldiers in Donbas

Meike Eijsberg, Cameron Manley and Emma Albright

A new Pentagon report has found that Russia is continuing to reduce the scale of its military actions toward more "small" operations, which is another sign that it has lowered the ambitions of its invasion of Ukraine.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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The Washington Post, citing a U.S. Department of Defense official, reports that instead of the typical battalion tactical groups, which number several hundred soldiers, the Russians have now shifted to attacks by smaller units, each ranging from a few dozen to a hundred soldiers. These smaller units have also scaled down their objectives and are targeting towns, villages and crossroads.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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