When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Switzerland

Who Picks Up The Tab After A Night At The “Boozers’ Hotel”?

Some 500 people annually spend a night in Zurich's so-called "Boozers' Hotel," a sober-up facility run by local police. City officials agree they need to keep the drunk tank operating, but debate over who should pay for

After a long night of drinking... (Nurse Kate)
After a long night of drinking... (Nurse Kate)


*NEWSBITES


ZURICH -- Where does the responsibility of the municipality end and personal responsibility begin? A flare-up erupted around that issue at a recent meeting of the Zurich City Council's Health Commission.

The catalyst was the sobering-up facility at the Urania police station, popularly known as the "Boozers' Hotel," which has special cells where drunks can bed down for the night. The City Council wants to continue with the facility, which began as a pilot project two years ago. The 13-person Commission agrees, but not on who should pay for staying there – the city or the severly inebriated people dropped off their by police.

According to two independent sources present at the meeting, socialist and green Commission members want the city to pay. From their point of view, fall-down drunks are sick people who shouldn't be punished. Leftists also used the opportunity to try and clear up a discrepancy in existing practice. Right now, drunks delivered to the Boozers' Hotel have to pay between 650 and 950 Swiss francs ($700-$1,000) for disorderly conduct and/or endangering themselves or others. But those brought to other police stations to sleep it off aren't charged. In both cases, any medical expenses are picked up by the individual's health insurance policy (mandatory in Switzerland).

A centrist Christian Democrat member of the Commission has now drafted a motion to be put before the City Council that all drunks, regardless of which police station they are left in to sleep it off, be charged the same amount.

Last year, approximately 500 people, mostly men aged 18 to 40, were delivered to the Boozers' Hotel, which costs around 330,000 Swiss francs per year to operate. For 98% of those spending the night, the experience was a one-off. Although getting paid for the stays proved somewhat difficult at first, the police department says things have now improved.

The cost of giving drunks a place to spend the night would add an estimated 500,000 Swiss francs ($545,000) to the city's annual budget.

Read the full story in German by Stefan Häne

Photo – Nurse Kate

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

Why The 'Perfect Storm' Of Iran's Protests May Be Unstoppable

The latest round of anti-regime protests in Iran is different than other in the 40 years of the Islamic Republic: for its universality and boldness, the level of public fury and grief, and the role of women and social media. The target is not some policy or the economy, but the regime itself.

A woman holds a lock of her hair during a London rally to protest the murder of Mahsa Amini in London

Roshanak Astaraki

-Analysis-

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Tehran on Sept. 16, after a possible beating at a police station, has sparked outrage and mass protests in Iran and abroad. There have been demonstrations and a violent attempt to suppress them in more than 100 districts in every province of Iran.

These protests may look like others since 2017, and back even to 1999 — yet we may be facing an unprecedented turning point in Iranians' opposition to the Islamic Republic. Indeed newly installed conservative President Ibrahim Raisi could not have expected such momentum when he set off for a quick trip to New York and back for a meeting of the UN General Assembly.

For one of the mistakes of a regime that takes pride in dismissing the national traditions of Iran is to have overlooked the power of grief among our people.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ