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Uruguay Government Says Don't Smoke Pot -- Better To Eat It Instead

TELAM, EFE (ARGENTINA)

Worldcrunch

MONTEVIDEO – Uruguay introduced a bill last November to regulate production and sale of cannabis. Under the proposed legislation, Uruguayans over 18 will be able to purchase pot in state-approved distribution centers.

Time to light up? Well, not exactly.

While the country is waiting for Congress to pass the bill, the government has launched a campaign to alert people about risks of the drug and offer guidelines on the best way to consume pot, reports EFE.

Julio Calzada, secretary general of the Uruguayan drug taskforce, the Junta National de Drogas, said the government's public health campaign on cannabis use would be similar to a campaign against tobacco or alcohol use, according to Telam.

“The government has to adequately inform its citizens on the risks linked to the use of certain substances; we advocate a responsible use of alcohol, for instance, to minimize the damage it causes, and it is the same for marijuana,” said Calzada.

He added that the government did not “recommend the consumption of harmful substances, but it does inform about the least risky way of doing it.”

He warned that marijuana creates similar effects than tobacco, which causes damages to the respiratory system and suggested eating or inhaling pot instead.

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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