When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

x
Street scene near Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Street scene near Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Malik Ayub Sumbal

RAWALPINDI — When 40-year-old government employee Danial Ahmed has problems with his teeth, he goes to a quack on the streets of Rawalpindi, Pakistan. “The price of dental treatment is expensive,” he says. “I cannot afford it. These quacks offer cheap treatment. For just a few hundred rupees, we can get relief from toothache and other oral infections.”

These cheap alternatives to real doctors can easily be found on virtually any roadside in Pakistan. They sit along the streets or in a small kiosks, where patients are treated on the spot.

According to the government, there are more than 600,000 of such sham doctors practising across Pakistan. They claim they can treat anything from minor dental problems to deadly diseases, and they’re obviously offering their services without authorized medical degrees.

Many poor people prefer going to them than to real doctors, as private medical practices and legitimate clinics charge what for them is too hefty a sum.

Ahmed Khan, 50, is sitting on the pavement in Rawalpindi’s busiest square. He has been treating patients here for the last two decades. He’s well known among his clients — two to three dozen visit him every day — for treating everything from headaches to dental problems.

“I’m experienced in doing this job,” he says. “I have treated hundreds of patients each day. The majority of them get relief after my treatment. Otherwise, why would they visit me?”

Most of his patients are from poor families and cannot afford anything else. Khan and others like him charge as little as $1 dollar and provide cheap medicine.

Dr. Muhammad Nawaz Khokar is among those who are concerned about the practice. “They’re playing with the lives of innocent people,” he says. “And they have no expertise in diseases. They use unsterilized equipment, which is a major reason for the spread of diseases from one patient to another. This is how the majority of diseases are being transmitted in Pakistan.”

In 2009, the Supreme Court ordered health secretaries to take action against quackery, but so far nothing has happened. A year later, the government passed the Health Care Commission Act and asked all local authorities to end quackery in their districts. But many of them operate in rural areas that have limited medical facilities.

“We have started to crack down against them, but they have strong backing,” says Dr. A.K. Niazi, head of the Rawalpindi District Health Office. “There’s a law against quacks, but it’s not implemented. According to the law, quacks should be put behind bars and are not eligible for bail.”

In fact, dozens of illegal clinics have been closed down. But examples of these fake doctors going to jail because of what they’re doing are still very rare.

Muhammad Qasim Khan, 45, still regrets his decision to visit one of these unqualified people for his illness. “I went to a quack near my house for medication for my fever,” he recalls. “But he injected me with something, and now I’ve been infected with hepatitis. I’m now undergoing treatment for this fatal disease. It’s been a lesson for me — never ever go to a quack. They can be deadly.”



You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

The Days After: What Would Happen If Putin Opts For A Tactical Nuclear Strike

The risk of the Kremlin launching a tactical nuclear weapon on Ukraine is small but not impossible. The Western response would itself set off a counter-response, which might contain or spiral to the worst-case scenario.

An anti-nuclear activist impersonates Vladimir Putin at a rally in Berlin.

Yves Bourdillon

-Analysis-

PARISVladimir Putin could “go nuclear” in Ukraine. Yes, this expression, which metaphorically means “taking the extreme, drastic action,” is now literally considered a possibility as well. Cornered and humiliated by a now plausible military defeat, experts say the Kremlin could launch a tactical nuclear bomb on a Ukrainian site in a desperate attempt to turn the tables.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

In any case, this is what Putin — who put Russia's nuclear forces on alert just after the start of the invasion in late February — is aiming to achieve: to terrorize populations in Western countries to push their leaders to let go of Ukraine.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ