EL PAIS (Uruguay) CLARIN (Argentina)

MONTEVIDEO - The past year has been a momentous one for supporters of gay marriage. And 2013 looks like it may begin with at least one more country -- and the second ever in Latin America -- to legalize same-sex marriage.

Last week, the lower house of Uruguay’s legislature approved a bill legalizing same sex marriage, El Pais reports. The bill will now move to the Senate for approval and then to the desk of President Jose Mujica, who plans to sign the bill in the beginning of 2013, Clarin reports.

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A 2011 Gay Right demonstration in Uruguay (Luz Rios)

In addition to legalizing same-sex marriage, the bill allows couples, both gay and heterosexual, to choose the order of their children’s last names. In Spanish-speaking countries it is common for children to have two last names - the first one from the father’s side of the family, the second one from the mother’s side.

Couples in Uruguay will now be able to choose the order, El Pais reports. Uruguay would be the second Latin American country to legalize gay marriage at a national level, after Argentina, which legalized gay marriage in 2010.

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Ideas

Biden's Democracy Summit: The Sad Truth About The Invitation List

Can the countries the United States have invited to an exclusive summit on democracy safeguard and spread a system that is inherently flawed and fragile?

The U.S. invited Taiwan to take part to the Summit for Democracy

Marcos Peckel

-OpEd-

BOGOTÁ — Don't expect much from the Summit for Democracy, summoned by the U.S. President Joe Biden.

Slated later this week, it follows other initiatives to defend and promote democracy worldwide, and will convene by video remote the representatives of 110 invited countries, which the U.S. State Department considers democracies.

Its three stated objectives are: defense against authoritarianism, fighting corruption and promoting respect for human rights.

The first controversy around the gathering emerged from the guest list, which includes some of the United States' chief regional allies.

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