When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Germany

The Newest Divo In Munich's Art Scene Is Nigerian-Born Curator Okwui Enwezor

He’s organized exhibitions from Johannesburg to New York. Now, Nigerian-American curator Okwui Enwezor, the new director of Munich’s historic Haus der Kunst, is taking Germany by storm.

Nigerian-born Okwui Enwezor, the new director of Munich's Haus der Kunst
Nigerian-born Okwui Enwezor, the new director of Munich's Haus der Kunst
Anna Fischhaber

MUNICH -- You will not find a smarter or better connected museum head anywhere on the planet. And certainly not one with a more polished command of protocol. That is, if you believe what Munich's in-crowd has been saying these past couple of months -- although some do wonder aloud why a person with such global experience would accept a job in a provincial capital. Now, however, "it has become a reality," as Bavaria's Minister of Science Wolfgang Heubisch put it a bit awkwardly, but with great pride, when on Thursday he officially introduced Okwui Enwezor as the new director of the Haus der Kunst.

Enwezor, who was born in 1963 in Kalaba, Nigeria, looks a little lost as he enters the huge room in the monumental building that dates back to the National Socialist era. There are surely less daunting tasks than taking the helm of an art gallery that – while it enjoys an international reputation – doesn't have its own collection but does have a difficult history. Enwezor, who has signed a five-year contract, calls it a "challenge," an "exciting perspective." He intends to create a separate space on the ground floor where visitors can learn about the history of the gallery. However, he says he does not want to focus too much on the National Socialist architecture – "you can't put a building on trial," he told the Süddeutsche Zeitung.

Keep reading...Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

International Swimming’s top ruling body FINA voted last weekend to ban transgender athletes

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — a topic that you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

Featuring, this week:

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ