When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!

Worldcrunch

FAMIGLIA CRISTIANA, CORRIERE DELLA SERA (Italy)

VATICAN CITY – If ever "Da Vinci Code" author Dan Brown feels forgotten, if he ever needs a surprise shot of P.R....he knows he can always count on Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone.

The Vatican's Secretary of State, effectively the No. 2 man in the Catholic Church hierarchy, dusted off the author of the oh-so-last-decade thriller as he responded to an ongoing Holy See scandal of leaked documents and palace intrigue.

Breaking his silence this week, the powerful Cardinal gave an interview with Italian weekly Famiglia Cristiana, in which he defended Pope Benedict XVI and waved off the supposed power struggles inside the Roman Curia as a case of too many journalists who "like to pretend they are Dan Brown."

A layman who worked as the Pope's personal butler has been arrested, accused of having leaked reams of confidential documents. The Pope has assigned a special investigative commission of three senior Cardinals to delve into the matter. Most Vatican insiders believe that the leaks are part of a plot to discredit Bertone and force his resignation.

But the ready-for-prime-time Dan Brown citation is not the first time Bertone has singled out the American author for special attention. Back in 2006, while serving as Archbishop of Genoa, Bertone declared that the then new film adaption of Da Vinci Code should be boycotted for its anti-Christian storyline.

Some may heed the clerical warnings, but any P.R. expert will tell you, the Cardinal offers the best mass marketing Brown could never buy.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Feeling overworked but not yet burned out? Often the problem is “burn-on,” an under-researched phenomenon whose sufferers desperately struggle to keep up and meet their own expectations — with dangerous consequences for their health.

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Burn-out is the result of sustained periods of stress at work

Beate Strobel

At first glance, Mr L seems to be a successful man with a well-rounded life: middle management, happily married, father of two. If you ask him how he is, he responds with a smile and a “Fine thanks”. But everything is not fine. When he was admitted to the psychosomatic clinic Kloster Diessen, Mr L described his emotional life as hollow and empty.

Although outwardly he is still putting on a good face, he has been privately struggling for some time. Everything that used to bring him joy and fun has become simply another chore. He can hardly remember what it feels like to enjoy his life.

For psychotherapist Professor Bert te Wildt, who heads the psychosomatic clinic in Ammersee in Bavaria, Germany, the symptoms of Patient L. make him a prime example of a new and so far under-researched syndrome, that he calls “burn-on”. Working with psychologist Timo Schiele, he has published his findings about the phenomenon in a book, Burn-On.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest

InterNations