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TERRA (Brazil)

RIO DE JANEIRO - Does anyone have any doubts about Gisele's beauty? Well apparently, before rising to supermodel status, Brazil's Gisele Bündchen was rejected 42 straight times when trying to get an international runway job in London, the website of the Brazilian magazine Terra reported. "I turned to myself and asked ‘am I really a model?,"" she confessed to an audience of girls aiming for a career in fashion, as part of a contest this week in Rio de Janeiro.

"It was shocking to hear so many negative responses. You start to get a bit down. I was told that I wasn't well-suited" for modeling, she said. Later, of course, Gisele became one of the world's most successful models. Born in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, the 31-year-old belongs to the sixth-generation of a German immigrant family.

To succeed in the fashion world, one has to be committed, qualified, and a bit lucky, Gisele told the aspiring models. "When somebody said ‘No" to me, I knew it was nothing personal. Each person has an idea in his or her mind of what to expect from others. You have to be at the right place, at the right moment."

Gisele confessed she still feels anxious when she goes on the catwalk. "This is because I'm always trying to do my best."

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