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The 42 Rejections Of Gisele

Worldcrunch

TERRA (Brazil)

RIO DE JANEIRO - Does anyone have any doubts about Gisele's beauty? Well apparently, before rising to supermodel status, Brazil's Gisele Bündchen was rejected 42 straight times when trying to get an international runway job in London, the website of the Brazilian magazine Terra reported. "I turned to myself and asked ‘am I really a model?,"" she confessed to an audience of girls aiming for a career in fashion, as part of a contest this week in Rio de Janeiro.

"It was shocking to hear so many negative responses. You start to get a bit down. I was told that I wasn't well-suited" for modeling, she said. Later, of course, Gisele became one of the world's most successful models. Born in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, the 31-year-old belongs to the sixth-generation of a German immigrant family.

To succeed in the fashion world, one has to be committed, qualified, and a bit lucky, Gisele told the aspiring models. "When somebody said ‘No" to me, I knew it was nothing personal. Each person has an idea in his or her mind of what to expect from others. You have to be at the right place, at the right moment."

Gisele confessed she still feels anxious when she goes on the catwalk. "This is because I'm always trying to do my best."

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Ideas

"Collateral Benefit": Could Putin's Launching A Failed War Make The World Better?

Consider the inverse of "collateral damage." Envision Russia's defeat and the triumph of a democratic coalition offers reflection on the most weighty sense of costs and benefits.

Photo of a doll representing Russian President Vladimir Putin

Demonstrators holding a doll with a picture of Russian President Putin

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — The concept of collateral damage has developed in the course of so-called "asymmetrical” wars, fought between opponents considered unequal.

The U.S. drone which targeted rebel fighters in Afghanistan, and annihilated an entire family gathered for a wedding, appears to be the perfect example of collateral damage: a doubtful military gain, and a certain political cost. One might also consider the American bombing of Normandy towns around June 6, 1944 as collateral damage.

But is it possible to reverse the expression, and speak of "collateral benefits"? When applied to an armed conflict, the expression may seem shocking.

No one benefits from a war, which leaves in its trace a trail of dead, wounded and displaced people, destroyed cities or children brutally torn from their parents.

And yet the notion of "collateral benefits" is particularly applicable to the war that has been raging in Ukraine for almost a year.

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