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LA STAMPA (Italy)

Worldcrunch

ROME- Ever mail something that just flat disappears? Wondering where it wound up? For thousands of Italians whose mail was lost, the only consolation is that they now know where it went. For some, the answer may be exactly what they'd feared: in a pile in some lazy postman's house.

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Simone Ramella

Two hundred kilograms (440 lbs) of mail was discovered by an Italian police Carabinieri unit in the small town of Agosta, east of Rome, with some dating back to 2011 reports La Stampa. Officers discovered the bags of mail during a normal patrol, spotting the emblem of the Italian Post Office. Eventually, they traced the mail to a 50-year-old mailman who, on occasions, had left work early -- leaving letters and parcels undelivered to businesses and homes -- and just bringing it all back to his house, to throw it away later.

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User:Mattes

The surviving post was sent back to the distribution center to be delivered (better late than never!) to the addressees. The postman was charged with multiple offenses including property infringement and suppression of correspondence.

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Greenpeace activists project the words “Risky & unnecessary” on the cooling tower of the Isar 2 nuclear power plant in Essenbach, Germany. The German government has delayed its long planned final phase-out of nuclear plants to keep as emergency reserve into 2023 as Russia threatens to cut off all gas supplies.

Anne-Sophie Goninet, Lisa Berdet, Chloé Touchard and Lila Paulou

👋 Ushé-ushé!*

Welcome to Tuesday, where Ukraine continues to reconquer territory, fresh clashes on the Armenia-Azerbaijan border leave at least 49 dead and France says adieu to two 20th-century titans of the visual arts. Meanwhile, business daily Les Echos draws a profile of Vladimir Potanin, one of Russia's top 10 billionaires who continues to grow his business despite Western sanctions.

[*Kanuri, Nigeria, Niger, Chad and Cameroon]

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