When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Italy

That Ferrari You Just Bought Is Really A Toyota

CORRIERE DELLA SERA (Italy)

Worldcrunch

Was it the slightly undersized wheels that tipped them off, or maybe the front bumper that looked a bit too square, or something just not quite right in the line of the roof?

Unfortunately for this Lithuanian driver, set to cross the Swiss border from Italy with what he was touting as a brand new Ferrari F430 Spider on a car trailer, the customs officers in Ponte Chiasso had an eye and/or ear for fake cars, no matter how convincing the imitation, Milan daily Corriere della Sera reports.

Together with the Italian finance police, the customs officers ended up seizing the faux clone -- which was built off the chassis of a far more modest Toyota sports car -- and charging its owner with violations of copyright law.

What about you: Can you spot the differences between the fake F430 Spider seized in Italy (left) and a real one (right)?

The car whose body was used for this copy is a Toyota Mr2, which is a sporty little ride, but goes for about one-tenth the 175,000-euro pricetag listed for the Ferrari F430. We can only wonder what will be the cost for the owner for pimping that ride…

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Sources

Indigenous Women Of Ecuador Set Example For Sustainable Agriculture

In southern Ecuador, a women-led agricultural program offers valuable lessons on sustainable farming methods, but also how to end violence.

Photo of women walking in Ecuador

Women walking in Guangaje Ecuador

Camila Albuja

SARAGURO — Here in this corner of southern Ecuador, life seems to be like a mandala — everything is cleverly used in this ancestral system of circular production. But the women of Saraguro had to fight and resist to make their way of life, protecting the local water and the seeds. When weaving, the women share and take care of each other, also weaving a sense of community.

With the wrinkled tips of her fingers, Mercedes Quizhpe, an indigenous woman from the Kichwa Saraguro people, washes one by one the freshly harvested vegetables from her garden. Standing on a small bench, with her hands plunged into the strong torrent of icy water and the bone-chilling early morning breeze, she checks that each one of her vegetables is ready for fair day. Her actions hold a life of historical resistance, one that prioritizes the care of life through the defense of territory and food sovereignty.

Mercedes' way of life is also one that holds many potential lessons for how to do agriculture and tourism better.

In the province of Loja, work begins before sunrise. At 5:00 a.m., the barking of dogs, the guardians of each house, starts. There is that characteristic smell of damp earth from the morning dew. Sheep bah uninterruptedly through the day. With all this life around, the crowing of early-rising roosters doesn't sound so lonely.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest