When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Sources

Ten Things You Didn't Know About Usain Bolt

LE NOUVEL OBSERVATEUR (France)

Worldcrunch

Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt won gold in the Men's 100 meter final in the London 2012 Olympics on Sunday, becoming only the second sprinter to win two consecutive 100m Olympic races.


LONDRES 2012 - Usain BOLT double champion...par VideosMediaStudio

Bolt shot to fame during the 2008 Beijing Olympics, and his 9""63 performance last night - the second fastest time ever - confirmed his star status. The Nouvel Observateur has collected some little-known facts about the fastest man in the world:

1. His right leg is shorter than his left by approximately 1.5 centimeters, a result of his atypical running style. Bolt runs with his bust outright and his head straight, which has unbalanced his pelvis.

2. Instead of leading an extravagant party life, he likes to hang out with friends at his house in Kingston, Jamaica, and play dominos late into the night. He is also a fan of video games and sometimes plays the Fifa soccer game with fellow Jamaican sprinter Yohan Blake before competitions.

3. He works harder than you think: Bolt takes it easy at home, but he goes all out during training. In a France 2 documentary, his father says he once says he saw Bolt throw up during training.

4. He wanted to be a professional cricket player. Cricket is a very popular sport in Jamaica, where Bolt and his friends imitated their favorite Indian and Pakistani players when they were young. Bolt was a fan of Indian batsman Sachin Tendulkar.

5. Bolt was mischievous and restless as a child, and his father sometimes beat him. Bolt's exasperated parents took him to a doctor, who diagnosed him with hyperactivity.

6. In an interview with l'Equipe Mag, Bolt tells how he witnessed the accident that killed his grand-father when he was nine years old. "My grand-father died in front of my eyes. We had an outside kitchen and the ground was humid. He slipped. His skull hit the door," he said. "It was strange, I didn't feel any panic or anything like it. I don't think I realized what happened. I only understood the event a few days later, during the funeral."

7. He started early: he took part in the junior world championships when he was 15, winning the 200 meter race. A year later, during the panamerican championships, he broke the junior world record for 200m with 20""13. The "Bolt" was born.

8. He once failed miserably at the Olympics: before London and Beijing, his 2004 Athens Olympics ended very badly. Injured, under pressure and only 17-years-old, he was eliminated in the first round of the 200m race.

9. After the Athens Olympics and another failed race during the world championships two years later, Bolt came under a lot of fire in Jamaica. The man who is now the country's greatest athletic star was then heavily criticized for his alleged lack of training and too much partying.

10. He sees "Healing Hans," a 70-year-old German doctor who treats elite athletes at his clinic in Munich using unconventional and controversial techniques, including injections of Actovegin, a product derived from calf's blood. The Jamaican sprinter was introduced to Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt by Glenn Mills, Bolt's coach.

Pic: Usain Bolt strikes his famous pose after winning the #100mfinal at #London2012 - a fantastic moment twitter.com/London2012/sta…

— London 2012 (@London2012) August 5, 2012

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

Parenthood And The Pressure Of Always Having To Be Doing Better

As a father myself, I'm now better able to understand the pressures my own dad faced. It's helped me face my own internal demands to constantly be more productive and do better.

Photo of a father with a son on his shoulders

Father and son in the streets of Madrid, Spain

Ignacio Pereyra*

-Essay-

When I was a child — I must have been around eight or so — whenever we headed with my mom and grandma to my aunt's country house in Don Torcuato, outside of Buenos Aires, there was the joy of summer plans. Spending the day outdoors, playing soccer in the field, being in the swimming pool and eating delicious food.

But when I focus on the moment, something like a painful thorn appears in the background: from the back window of the car I see my dad standing on the sidewalk waving us goodbye. Sometimes he would stay at home. “I have to work” was the line he used.

Maybe one of my older siblings would also stay behind with him, but I'm sure there were no children left around because we were all enthusiastic about going to my aunt’s. For a long time in his life, for my old man, those summer days must have been the closest he came to being alone, in silence (which he liked so much) and in calm, considering that he was the father of seven. But I can only see this and say it out loud today.

Over the years, the scene repeated itself: the destination changed — it could be a birthday or a family reunion. The thorn was no longer invisible but began to be uncomfortable as, being older, my interpretation of the events changed. When words were absent, I started to guess what might be happening — and we know how random guessing can be.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest