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Switzerland

Swiss Town Builds Separate 'Refugee Path' Reminiscent Of Europe's Jewish Ghettos

A Swiss town has agreed, grudgingly, to accept 19 new asylum seekers. But the town is doing all it can to keep them out of sight, including a "Refugee path" that recalls "Jewish paths" that used to lead to and from ghet

Birmensdorf, Switzerland
Birmensdorf, Switzerland

BIRMENSDORF - Newcomers to this quiet town of 5,900 near Zurich, are generally lead on a pleasant walk through town. Large yellow signs point out the way to the city's barracks and to the treasured "Paradiesliweg" that goes through the Reppisch river valley. The guide will usually lead the visitor through a residential neighborhood on the way.

But for 19 new arrivals, who recently moved into two trailers right next to the barracks, there is a completely different route. For them, the town expanded an old trail that connected the two trailers directly to the somewhat uninteresting main street, passing though a small piece of the forest. City workers cleared the trees and did the planning. The trail is now a roomy gravel path, lit up at night. The idea: Thanks to this path, the 19 asylum seekers can go "directly from the train station to the trailers without passing through the neighborhood," as Annegret Grossen, head of social services, said of the town's hopes for the asylum trailers.

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Ukrainian protestors stand at Brandenburg Gate in Berlin to mark Vyshyvanka Day, an International day to celebrate Ukrainian heritage and traditions

Lisa Berdet, Lila Paulou and Bertrand Hauger.

👋 Guten Tag!*

Welcome to Friday, where Russia intensifies shelling in eastern Ukraine, Biden lands in South Korea, and a Mercedes becomes the most expensive car ever sold. Meanwhile, for German daily die Welt, Cosima Lutz explores the sizzling question of the skyrocketing price of cooking oils.

[*German]

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