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Switzerland

Surviving A Night In Zurich’s Worst Hotel

Armed with a healthy dose of courage – and his own sleeping bag – one Swiss reporter sets off on a perilous quest to brave Zurich’s cheapest sleeping establishment: the infamous Krone.

A 63 euros per night, the Hotel Krone is one of Zurich's most affordable
A 63 euros per night, the Hotel Krone is one of Zurich's most affordable
Peter Aeschlimann

ZURICH - It's a beautiful evening in Zurich. Maybe a little cool for this time of year; it rained during the afternoon, but now the clouds have cleared. On the Gemüsebrücke—a bridge spanning the Limmat River that divides the city's Old Town—Japanese tourists are posing for pictures. Behind them, the rays of the late-day sun bounce off the dark blue water. I give the tourists a friendly nod. Walking along carrying my overnight bag, I feel a strange bond with them. In the cafés along Limmatquai, white-shirted waitstaff serve customers aperitifs. It's like being on vacation.

Then I spot the hotel. I realize that I've passed it countless times before, just never noticed it. Didn't see how chunks of plaster have fallen from the facade, or just how lopsided the "K" is on the neon Krone sign above the door. Inside, I tell the friendly receptionist I've reserved a single room. She charges 76 francs (63 euros) to my credit card and hands me a key. Room 54. "Fifth floor,"" she says, pointing the way to the elevator.

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A man speaks on the phone as the oil refinery of Lysychansk in the Luhansk region, Ukraine, burns in the background

Lila Paulou, Lisa Berdet and Bertrand Hauger.

👋 வணக்கம்!*

Welcome to Monday, where Anthony Albanese is sworn in as Australia's new prime minister, a verdict is in for the first war crimes trial in Ukraine and the food & energy industrials get outrageously richer. In Colombian daily El Espectador, María Mónica Monsalve Sánchez explores how Colombia is toeing the line between carbon-offsetting and unabashed greenwashing.

[*Vanakkam, Tamil - India]

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