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So You Want To Be A Private Eye?

Bruno Strebel spends his days tracking missing persons, insurance scammers and white-collar criminals. The former cop founded a detective school that teaches others to do the same.

I spy with my little eye
I spy with my little eye
Valérie de Graffenried

ZURICH — He takes out an old leather briefcase and points to a tiny hole on the side the size of a pin head. “That’s where the camera is. Invisible from the outside,” says 60-year-old Bruno Strebel, head of Zurich’s Private Detective Academy, “the only school of this type in Switzerland.” This diminutive man is also the chairman of the Professional Detectives Association, and his cold blue eyes try to assess people quickly. He weighs every word he speaks.

We’re meeting at his academy’s offices in the Zurich neighborhood of Höngg. A former airport police officer, Strebel became a detective in 1977. “A man was watching me at my workplace,” he explains. “One day, he came up to me, told me I could be doing much better and gave me his detective card. A few weeks later, intrigued, I called him, and we started working together.”

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Economy

The Bogus Concept Of "Carbon-Neutral" Oil

The Colombian president recently said that the country had exported one million barrels of carbon-neutral or offset oil. But in an unregulated carbon market, such a claim is pure greenwashing.

People walk in the streets of Bogotá

María Mónica Monsalve Sánchez

-OpEd-

BOGOTÁ - In March this year, various national and corporate leaders met in Houston, Texas, for CERAWeek, an annual conference to discuss the world's energy challenges. Colombia's President Iván Duque took the opportunity to remind participants that his country produced just 0.6% of the world's carbon emissions even as it had raised crude production to one million barrels a day.

He said oil should not be seen as an enemy, since the fight was really against greenhouse gas emissions. He also revealed at the event that the country's national oil firm, Ecopetrol, had sold the Asian market its first million barrels of carbon-neutral or offset crude, consisting of the entire extraction, production and exportation chain.

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