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Worldcrunch

LE MONDE (France), NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

GABON - Authorities in Gabon burned more than 4.5 tons of illegal ivory this week after the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species released a report showing that elephant poaching has reached a record high in the past few years.

The year 2011 saw the highest recorded levels of elephant killings since the ivory trade was banned in 1989, according to National Geographic. Some 24.3 tons of ivory were intercepted last year, with most of it destined for China and Thailand, where demand and prices are rising.

Le Monde reports that more than 1,200 raw pieces and 17,000 sculpted pieces of ivory were burned in the bonfire personally lit by Gabonese president Ali Bongo Ondimba on Wednesday, as a gesture to show support for protecting elephants.

The total value of the burned ivory topped 7.6 million euros, and the World Wildlife Fund, which was present at the event, estimated that this represented almost 850 elephants killed.

Gabon is home to approximately 50,000 of the remaining 472,000 to 690,000 African elephants that still live on the continent. Watch the WWF video below of the Gabonese President at the ivory burning explaining his country's position on elephant poaching:

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Ideas

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Elon Musk bought Twitter in the name of absolute freedom. But numerous research shows that social media hate speech leads to actual violence. Musk and others running social networks need to strike a balance.

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Freedom on social networks can result in insults and defamation

Jean-Marc Vittori

-Analysis-

PARIS — Elon Musk is the world's leading reckless driver. The ever unpredictable CEO of Tesla and SpaceX is now behind a very different wheel as the new head of Twitter.

He began by banning remote work before slightly backtracking and authorizing it for the company’s “significant contributors.” Now he’s opened the door to Donald Trump to return to Twitter, while at the same time vaunting a decrease in the number of hate-messages that appear on the social network…all while firing Twitter’s content moderation teams.

But this time, the world’s richest man will have to make choices. He’ll have to limit his otherwise unconditional love of free speech. “Freedom consists of being able to do everything that does not harm others,” proclaimed the French-born Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789.

Yet freedom on social networks results not only in insults and defamation, but sometimes also in physical aggression.

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