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CHINA TIMES (Taiwan)

SEOUL - In 35 separate drug raids, South Korean customs officials say they have confiscated 17,000 "capsules of human flesh" originating in China.

These capsules are allegedly made from the corpses of dead babies or fetuses, according to information first reported in JoongAng Ilbo, a South Korean newspaper. This so-called "medicine" is advertized as a sort of magical cure for all diseases, while also enhancing male vitality and boosting sexual performance. The capsules are sold on the black market at high prices by both Chinese or North Koreans living in China.

Analysis shows that the capsules consist of at least 99.7 % of the same DNA as found in humans. A Chinese medicine expert says that the source of the material may be from human placenta, the China Times reports. In an effort to stop the consumption of these capsules the South Korean government has warned people that they contain material from dangerous bugs.

China has been consumed in recent weeks by a similar scandal about drug capsules made from processed leather waste containing excessively high levels of chromium.

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Green

Fading Flavor: Production Of Saffron Declines Sharply

Saffron is well-known for its flavor and its expense. But in Kashmir, one of the flew places it grows, cultivation has fallen dramatically thanks for climate change, industry, and farming methods.

Photo of women harvesting saffron in Kashmir

Harvesting of Saffron in Kashmir

Mubashir Naik

In northern India along the bustling Jammu-Srinagar national highway near Pampore — known as the saffron town of Kashmir —people are busy picking up saffron flowers to fill their wicker baskets.

During the autumn season, this is a common sight in the Valley as saffron harvesting is celebrated like a festival in Kashmir. The crop is harvested once a year from October 21 to mid-November.

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